Thermae of Constantine

Arles, France

The Thermae of Constantine (Baths of Constantine), the Roman bathing complex, dates from the 4th century AD. Of the once-extensive series of buildings, which resembled a palace, only the Caldarium (warm bath) and parts of the Hypocaust (underfloor heating) and the Tepidarium (warm air room) remain. The Thermae of Constantine has been listed as World Heritage Sites since 1981.

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Details

Founded: 300-400 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anthony (3 years ago)
Enjoy looking through the bars. Nothing to see here that can’t be seen from around the corner
Stephen Bennett (3 years ago)
About a quarter of the original building remains, which makes it difficult to understand. However is still worth a visit, if you're doing the other Roman sites, with the multi-site tourist pass.
Andrej D (3 years ago)
Amazing...how the Romans knew how to enjoy life...
Robert Vansittart (3 years ago)
Some interesting details of the structure of Roman baths
Sacha Ratcliffe (3 years ago)
Nothing much remains of the 4th century Roman baths, but it is interesting to wander around these ruins and ponder on the people who lived here 1700 years ago. A pleasant half hour can be spent here, for the modest fee of €4.
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