Arles and Provence Antiques Museum

Arles, France

The Musée départemental Arles antique is an archeological museum housed in a modern building designed and built in 1995 by the architect Henri Ciriani. The museum houses a large collection of antiquities, including monumental Roman sculptures from the local region. Among the exhibits is a model of the multiple overshot water mills which existed at Barbegal, and have been referred to as 'the greatest known concentration of mechanical power in the ancient world'. The Arles Rhône 3, an ancient Roman boat discovered in 2011, is on display since 2013.

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Founded: 1995
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arni Sholihah (2 years ago)
If you're student, you're lucky. It's free entry for student here.
Marie Khan (2 years ago)
Nice simple museum which was not crowded so can take your time to visit. Good way to get a historical overview of this specific city and region.
Dom Andrews (3 years ago)
Beautifully curated and laid out. My favourite area was the ship raised from the bottom of the Rhone together with all the amazing artefacts found in the silt - glassware, jewellery, amphorae etc. Also loved the spaciousness of the exhibition that allowed you to wander among the exhibits and gasp in awe. Another highlight is the museum garden that houses loads of information about the Roman attitude to gardening and outdoor leisure.
M A Swaddle (3 years ago)
Magnificent. A museum not to be missed showing to Roman history of Arles. Well curated and displayed delightfully with enough information plus very knowledgeable staff, keen to assist, throughout. Plenty parking and we'll worth the detour out of the town.
Phillip Spencer (3 years ago)
An absolutely superb museum, we were fascinated by the range and type of exhibits, which are well laid out and with clear information. The Roman boat, recovered from the mud of the river Rhone nearby was a particular favourite. There are also well-reconstructed mosaics and a huge number of sarcophagi The building is modern and spacious, so even though we were on a day when entry was free we did not feel crowded. Highly recommended to anyone who is even remotely interested in the times around the Roman period in Provence.
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