Château de Coustaussa

Coustaussa, France

The original Château de Coustaussa was built by the Trencavels, Viscounts of the Razès, in the 12th century. It was the stronghold of Cathars until Simon de Montfort and his Crusaders conquered it during the Albigensian Crusade. After the Crusades, the Castle came into the possession of the de Montesquieu family. The present Château was apparently still in good shape until the 19th century, when an enterprising local realised that he could turn a few Francs by stripping out and selling the woodwork.

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Address

D312, Coustaussa, France
See all sites in Coustaussa

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.catharcastles.info

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

marcel bochaton (6 months ago)
Très belle forteresse en ruines et friches
Patricia Roussel (6 months ago)
Des ruines quoi....mais la région est magnifique...chaque village a son château!
Olga Bell (7 months ago)
Access a bit difficult but a very impressive ruin.
Pierre Thiault (13 months ago)
Very hard to access and abandoned. Interesting architectural details left.
Doriane Nadalin (14 months ago)
Wow
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