Georges Labit Museum

Toulouse, France

The Georges Labit Museum (founded in 1893) is dedicated to artifacts from the Far-Eastern and Egyptian civilizations. The museum was founded by Georges Labit (1862–1899), a passionate amateur who travelled the world in search of ancient art and artifacts. It is housed in a moorish villa erected by Toulousian architect Jules Calbayrac. The complex also contains an exotic garden, a specialist library, and a screening room.

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Founded: 1893
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Troltwentythree (2 years ago)
A tiny museum, but definitely worth a visit, lovely garden surrounding it too.
Paul Taylor (3 years ago)
The unfriendly staff made us feel most unwelcome and uncomfortable as they followed us around. The fact that we were with children made it worse especially when they made remarks about them.
KIRAN HEWGILL (3 years ago)
Amazed at the collection from various Asian countries invluding Egyp, India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Vietnam, China and Japan. The Egyptian Mummy is well preseved. Was so surprised to find an ancient sculpture from Indian Temples of Khajuraho!!!!Staff were informative and helpful. Do recommend a visit!!!!
Beanatta Zen (3 years ago)
Beautiful little museum, a good atmosphere. Would have loved it to be bigger.
Baptiste Bergelin (4 years ago)
Quite small, I visited the place during 30min and that was enough for me. The location is nice. The collection itself is kind of complete but I think you need to be an connoisseur to really enjoy what's there. It's not my kind of museum but that's my personal opinion.
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