Plainburg Castle Ruins

Großgmain, Austria

Plainburg Castle - the family seat of the Counts of Plain and a symbol of Großgmain - is one of Austria's oldest castle ruins and offers a magnificent view over Großgmain and the surrounding mountains. All that remains of the original structure are the outside walls, with a thickness of 1.4m and standing to a height of over 5m. A short climb rewards the visitor with the opportunity to stop and rest awhile at the viewing platform overlooking Großgmain. Before it became the seat of the Counts of Plain, the mountain was a Celtic burial ground during the late Bronze Age around 1200 BC. Some time later, in about 1100 AD, Count Werigand of Plain built Plainburg Castle.

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Details

Founded: c. 1100
Category: Ruins in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bruce Rector (2 years ago)
Very interesting with great history.
Jesse Rousset (2 years ago)
Very cool place! The hill is a little steep, but definitely worth the climb. Go check it out!
Knowledge Seeker (2 years ago)
It looks like a neat place and I was excited to see it during my day trip from The Eagle's Nest to the Hohensalzburg Fortress, but visitors beware.. it's not always open as the sign suggests. I have a fun photo of myself at about 3pm today trying to enter a locked gate while staring perplexed at the "open daily from 9am to 7pm" sign that was affixed to the gate. I didn't see a phone number to call and confirm the hours.. only the sign with the mayor's approval. I'll increase my rating if I ever make it back there and can actually enter the castle ruins.
Viktor Plohl (3 years ago)
Amazing view
Sebastian Schönbuchner (5 years ago)
st.urban
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