St. Rupert's Church

Vienna, Austria

St. Rupert's Church is traditionally considered to be the oldest church in Vienna. The church is located in one of the oldest parts of the city, the section of the Roman Vindobona. According to legend, it was founded by Cunald and Gisalrich, companions of Rupert during his occupation of the seat of bishop of Salzburg. However, because Salzburg had influence over religious issues in Vienna between 796 and 829, it is more probable that it was founded in this period.

The first reference in historical documentation is in a document of 1200 when Duke Heinrich II Jasomirgott describes a gift to the Schottenstift church. The document also mentions the Ruprechtskirche, which is labeled the oldest in the city. After the destruction of the Roman settlement, the core part of the city grew in the area near the church. It was the seat of the religious administration before that function was transferred to the Stephansdom in 1147. During the Middle Ages, the church was the seat of the Salt Office, which distributed salt to individual buyers and ensured its quality. The church overlooks the jetty of the salt merchants on the Danube channel.

The ivy-covered church has been rebuilt and altered many times in its history. In 1276, it was damaged by fire and modified. The choir dates from the 13th century, while the southern nave dates from the 15th century. In 1622, it was redecorated in Baroque style. It was also somewhat damaged by shellfire during World War II and affected by the demolition of the nearby ruins of another building. In the middle of the apse, there are two Romanesque stained-glass windows.

The oldest bells in Vienna are located in the church, dating from around 1280. The oldest glass window panes (dating from approximately 1370) can be found in the church. They depict a crucified Christ and the Madonna with baby. The arch on the western gallery has a plaque with the label AEIOU 1439, an undecyphered motto of Emperor Frederick III. The plaque was designed to commemorate the entrance of the emperor to Vienna on December 6, 1439.

A relic of the sarcophagus of Saint Vitalis is located in the church containing the remains of a claimed Christian victim from the Roman catacombs. This memorial of victimization has special meaning in modern times because the Gestapo headquarters, which was used for torture and the organization of Jewish deportations, was located nearby in the Morzinplatz square.

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Details

Founded: c. 800 AD
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

lynne whitworth (19 months ago)
A fabulous little church, the oldest in the city and delightful to sing a concert in.
Salih Gürel (19 months ago)
Oldest church in Vienna
Frank Stewart (21 months ago)
Wow, fantastic. A beautiful old chuch that needs to be visited when in Vienna. A small church that has a skeleton of St Rupert inside. A plain church inside but still very beautiful because it still exists. Located in the nightlife part of town.
Mike Stuchbery (2 years ago)
Vienna's oldest church, with a jewelled skeleton of a saint & medieval woodcarving.
David Sherwood (2 years ago)
St. Expert's Church is thought to the oldest in Vienna. The church bells date from around 1280. Some stain glass window panes date from around 1370. What struck me was the juxtaposition of this relatively simple and ancient church with the much more modern buildings around it and futuristic Vienna just across the Danube River.
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