Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church

Vienna, Austria

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in located in the historic Greek neighborhood of Vienna's Innere Stadt. Greek Orthodox churches have existed near this site since 1787, as a result of the 1781 Patent of Toleration issued by Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. The architect of the 1787 building was Peter Mollner.

The current building is a Byzantine Revival re-design of the Mollner building by Danish-Austrian neo-classic architect Theophil Hansen. Greek-Austrian diplomat and philanthropist Simon Sinas funded the project, one of many collaborations with Hansen in Vienna and Athens. The cathedral was inaugurated on December 21, 1858.

The exterior features two-tone brickwork and gilded archways. The elaborately ornamented sanctuary shows a stylish allusion to Baroque church architecture typical of southern Germany and Austria. A number of frescoes for the facade and vestibule were commissioned from the Austrian painter and art professor Carl Rahl, with other frescoes by Ludwig Thiersch.

Since 1963 the cathedral has been the seat of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Austria.

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Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nikol Manetta (6 months ago)
I feel very proud, as Greek, to visit such places aboard. This church has nothing to jelous from any other in Greece! You have to visit it!
Ellider Nano (9 months ago)
Was not open in their scheduled timetable twice. We loose a lot of time trying to visit and was not possible. Unacceptable.
Ognian Dimitrov (11 months ago)
Built in Neo-Byzantine style in 1850, the church is very interesting outside.
BradJill Travels (12 months ago)
The Greek Orthodox Church (Griechenkirche), also known as the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church is located in the innere Stradt on Fleischmarkt street. The church was built in 1787 by Theophil Edvard Hansen and is a rare example of a Byzantine style church found in Vienna. Here you can see an attractive red and gold striped (brick) exterior with classic arched windows. On the inside, there is an attractive narthex, featuring many columns, sloped ceiling and frescos. The church nave is heavily frescos, including some nice paintings, chandelier and an attractive iticonostasis in the front of the nave. Like many churches in the first district, the nave was in very good condition and the attendant on duty was happy for us to take pictures inside. Overall, we found the Griechenkirche a nice change of scenery from the mostly baroque and gothic style church scene in the first district. Looking very much more like church visits in Greece or Turkey, this is a pleasant surprise and interesting place to find and explore in the historic city centre.
Σοφία Σούρια (14 months ago)
Beautiful iconography art... has a special and different iconography school... once you enter the church you feel the eastern spirit...
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