Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church

Vienna, Austria

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in located in the historic Greek neighborhood of Vienna's Innere Stadt. Greek Orthodox churches have existed near this site since 1787, as a result of the 1781 Patent of Toleration issued by Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. The architect of the 1787 building was Peter Mollner.

The current building is a Byzantine Revival re-design of the Mollner building by Danish-Austrian neo-classic architect Theophil Hansen. Greek-Austrian diplomat and philanthropist Simon Sinas funded the project, one of many collaborations with Hansen in Vienna and Athens. The cathedral was inaugurated on December 21, 1858.

The exterior features two-tone brickwork and gilded archways. The elaborately ornamented sanctuary shows a stylish allusion to Baroque church architecture typical of southern Germany and Austria. A number of frescoes for the facade and vestibule were commissioned from the Austrian painter and art professor Carl Rahl, with other frescoes by Ludwig Thiersch.

Since 1963 the cathedral has been the seat of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Austria.

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Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Simina Ariadna (12 months ago)
It is a very beautiful church ! I love it. Historical landmark !
Viktor Kubesch (12 months ago)
It was nice!
Sam (2 years ago)
Nice place good for morning prayers And gives you a relaxing after feeling
Sam (2 years ago)
Nice place good for morning prayers And gives you a relaxing after feeling
Jinane Al Hanna (2 years ago)
Jesus save us.
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