Klosterneuburg Abbey

Klosterneuburg, Austria

Klosterneuburg Monastery was founded in 1114 by Saint Leopold III of Babenberg, the patron saint of Austria, and his second wife Agnes of Germany. In 1136, the abbey church was consecrated after 22 years of construction. The form of that original basilica has survived for nine centuries, despite many subsequent modifications and reconstructions.

The abbey church, dedicated the Nativity of Mary, was later remodeled in the Baroque style in the 17th century. The impressive monastery complex was mostly constructed between 1730 and 1834. Its foundations, including a castle tower and a Gothic chapel, date back to the 12th century. Other older buildings still extant within the complex include the chapel of 1318 with Saint Leopold's tomb. From 1634 on, the Habsburg rulers had the facilities rebuilt in the Baroque style, continued by the architects Jakob Prandtauer and Donato Felice d'Allio. The plans to embellish the monastery on the scale of an Austrian Escorial were later resumed by the Neoclassical architect Joseph Kornhäusel, though only small parts were actually carried out. In 1879, the abbey church and monastery were restored according to plans by Friedrich von Schmidt, and the neo-Gothic twin steeples were erected.

Klosterneuburg Monastery contains the Verduner Altar, made in 1181 by Nicholas of Verdun. Its three parts comprise 45 gilded copper plates modeled on Byzantine paragons, similar to the Shrine of the Three Kings at Cologne Cathedral. The monastery also contains a museum with a collection of Gothic and Baroque sculpture and a gallery of paintings, including fifteen panel paintings by Rueland Frueauf from 1505, four Passion paintings from the backside of the Verduner Altar from 1331, and the Babenberg genealogical tree.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1114
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Borbála Szabó (3 years ago)
Very nice and beutiful. Unfortunatelly we only had 2 hours to see the monastry, but I think it is easy to spend half day, or even a day here.
virginia mattimore (3 years ago)
Beautiful church. Great tour through the monestery. Lovely tour guide
Allen Harkleroad (3 years ago)
As a non-religious person I was a little hesitant going but was pleasantly surprised. There is a lot of interesting history presented and it isn't beat you over the head religious, except for the videos. Some of those were pretty ridiculous. Wine is the primary focus of the place even with it being a monastery. You'll find a lot of interesting information about wine in the area and there are English translations for most things. It's worth it to get a guided tour since you will be taken to areas that are not accessible to the general public.
Bernard Njenga (4 years ago)
Serene historical place. 900 years old and still looks fabulous. Loved it!
Ian Dixon (4 years ago)
One sometimes finds large churches or cathedrals to lack spirituality but this one is very different! Even though it is large on size one can find an intimate connection to God here, a truly wonderful place, I'm so glad I live close to it.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.