Clam castle was built in 1149 by Otto von Machland who owned all of Upper Austria. At that time it was a fortress consisting of two towers over 30 meters high. These two impressive buildings, one round and one rectangular, still exist in the very same shape today.

Soon after Otto von Machland died, the castle fell into the hands of robber barons. They were feared by the people of Upper Austria and excommunicated by the church. During the middle ages the ownership and construction of the castle changed several times until in 1454 the forefathers of the counts of Clam arrived

During the 30 year-war the Clam family had their own private army to defend the castle. In these times of turmoil and revolts Clam village also suffered a lot and was burned down several times. Clam was besieged many times but no hostile troops ever managed to capture the castle. However, in the mid 17th century when the war was over, the castle was in a very bad condition.

Under the regency of Johann Gottfried of Clam it was possible to renovate the entire castle. He started to transform the functional fortress into a comfortable castle as we see it today. He also built a church, a hospital and water pipes for the citizens of the village.

In the 18th century the wings housing the administration, the coaches and the horse stables were built. Today these wings form the outer yard.

Fortunately Clam castle also survived both world wars unharmed. Only the nuclear shelter, built in one of the castle’s cellars is a reminder of the 20th century.

Besides the Castle the estate includes several farmhouses, a riding school, a hydropower plant, farmland and forests.

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Address

Sperken 2, Klam, Austria
See all sites in Klam

Details

Founded: 1149
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.burgclam.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Cooke (2 years ago)
Great knight display and demo but long tour
Mary Ann Lumiqued (3 years ago)
Went for the Milow and Jack Johnson concert and had an amazing, overall experience! We did the VIP package (all you can eat and drink) and even stayed the night in the castle. Was a bit of a splurge but completely worth it. The sound quality was maybe the best I've ever heard for a concert. Was able to go to the front of the stage or climb back to the top and enjoy the view from there. Even able to meet Count Michael Burg himself as it is still a real castle in use with this Noble family living there. Had breakfast in the dining room and did a castle tour. Couldn't have asked for a better weekend.
Marcus Pointner (3 years ago)
Historical landmark in the center of Austria... Nice place to eat also in the so-called 'Meierhof' nearby...
Nadine Valk (3 years ago)
Highlight of our trip through Austria -castle tour with the Count & wine tasting with a beautiful view. Absolutely lovely!
Dominik Heinisch (3 years ago)
The castle itself is in a very good condition and still in use that makes in still alive and unique even it became a bit modern. Additional this is such a cool location for a concert! The count and his people are gentle and courteous! Nice to stay here over night. Very charming. Recommended
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