The first record Urvaste Church date back to 1413 and it is considered to be one of the oldest churches in Võrumaa. This church, dedicated to Saint Urban, was built in the form of a basilica in the Gothic style, the only such rural church in Estonia. It was mainly destroyed in Livonian War (1558), but reconstructed in 1620.

The Altar painting dates from 1885 and the painter is C. Walther. The Organ is a masterpiece by the Kriisa brothers from 1937-38. Church bells date from 1832.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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www.maaturism.ee

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User Reviews

scoot scoot MK (2 years ago)
Vets asus veits keerulises kohas ja õues oli külm.
Rott Ruudi (2 years ago)
Tore
Valeri Vihul (2 years ago)
Käisin surnuaial.
Toomas Madisson (3 years ago)
Ma ei tea kirikust muud, kui asub looduskaunis kohas. Põhjus, miks olin seal, oli soov kuulata Valgre ja Ojakääru loomingut. Maria Listra ja Jassi Zahharov - YouTube
Raido Tael (4 years ago)
VÄGA ilus koht. Kui satute siia kanti külastage seda kirikut kindlasti
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