Hohenwang castle dates back to the 12th century and was one of the most important medieval fortifications that time. It is exceptional long structure and one the largest castles in Styria. It consists of the stronghold and two outworks, which are separated by trenches. Their massive decline began in the late 18th century, after it was severely damaged by an earthquake. During World War II more parts of the ruins were destroyed by bombing.

Hohenwang served as a local administrative center, the protection of the population in times of crisis, the case-colonization and the associated spread of Christianity in the upper Muerztal. From the 13th century a priest resided at the castle.

Hohenwang is an elongated complex with stronghold, a deeper front castle with gatehouses and a curtain wall. It is oriented from southwest to northeast and extends over a total length of 90 meters. A donjon was not available. From the 13th to the 17th century, the romanesque core eastward to the Palas, a gallery, a kennel, a bastion and a representative gatehouse was enlarged. In a 15th-century chronicle exists a more detailed description of the interior of the castle, in the place, inter alia, of the chapel, a servants' room, some room, a large hall, four cellar, four cereal boxes, a bath-room, a kitchen and vaulted stables for twelve horses is talk. The three well-secured gates, two of which provided with a slip gate, the attachment to the ditch and finally the south, west and north, very steep cliffs made a storming of the fortress to a difficult task. In addition to the engraving by Georg Matthäus Vischer, the castle is also shown on a proclamation image that had given Ulrich Christoph von Scherffenberg in 1631 in order.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

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User Reviews

chetna bhutani (20 months ago)
Beautiful sunset spot and a good trek
WERNER Röslhuber (2 years ago)
Die Festung die im Kern auf das 12. Jahrhundert zurückgeht, ist das Wahrzeichen von Langenwang uns zählt zu den bedeutendsten mittelalterlichen Wehrbauten dieser Zeit und wegen Ihrer Länge auch zu den größten Burgen der Steiermark. Sie diente in erster Linie als regionaler Verwaltungssitz, der von Burgpflegern verwaltet wurde.
Mario Spreitzhofer (2 years ago)
Historischer Kraftort!
Ewald Kapfensteiner (2 years ago)
Schöne Ruinne in Langenwang
Steve Drtina (2 years ago)
Burg Ruine Hohenwang, Langenwang, Steiermark. Parken in Langenwang 25 min Wanderweg/ Forstweg. Schön gepflegte mittel große Ruine Anlage. Gut Restoriert und geplegte Anlage. Innen und aussen Mauern mit Toren. Werde sicher wieder kommen.
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