Hohenwang castle dates back to the 12th century and was one of the most important medieval fortifications that time. It is exceptional long structure and one the largest castles in Styria. It consists of the stronghold and two outworks, which are separated by trenches. Their massive decline began in the late 18th century, after it was severely damaged by an earthquake. During World War II more parts of the ruins were destroyed by bombing.

Hohenwang served as a local administrative center, the protection of the population in times of crisis, the case-colonization and the associated spread of Christianity in the upper Muerztal. From the 13th century a priest resided at the castle.

Hohenwang is an elongated complex with stronghold, a deeper front castle with gatehouses and a curtain wall. It is oriented from southwest to northeast and extends over a total length of 90 meters. A donjon was not available. From the 13th to the 17th century, the romanesque core eastward to the Palas, a gallery, a kennel, a bastion and a representative gatehouse was enlarged. In a 15th-century chronicle exists a more detailed description of the interior of the castle, in the place, inter alia, of the chapel, a servants' room, some room, a large hall, four cellar, four cereal boxes, a bath-room, a kitchen and vaulted stables for twelve horses is talk. The three well-secured gates, two of which provided with a slip gate, the attachment to the ditch and finally the south, west and north, very steep cliffs made a storming of the fortress to a difficult task. In addition to the engraving by Georg Matthäus Vischer, the castle is also shown on a proclamation image that had given Ulrich Christoph von Scherffenberg in 1631 in order.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ani Lieb (8 months ago)
If walls could talk, there would be so much to talk about, also thank you to all the hardworking helpers who make this ruin look so great!
Marjo Aaralex (9 months ago)
Some remains to be seen. The area itself is beautiful for hiking. Take a look, okay, but I wouldn't drive here just for that.
Constanta Chiriac (15 months ago)
The ruins tell their story. Can you imagine how they organized and lived the life of their master of this castle. I am glad that the place is maintained, is being renovated, we want a reconstruction based on real information. For a hike, the road is unbelievably beautiful and accessible, even now, in early February when the ice stiffens to set you back. Here, upstairs, as if all four seasons meet: the grass of a raw green, the bright summer sun, the dead leaves sprinkled on the edge of the trail and rugs stained by snow. The hike, starting and arriving at Langenwang church, lasted 2 and a half hours, long enough to admire the scenery, take pictures and enjoy relaxing on the benches in front of the castle.
Zoltán Bánfalvy (2 years ago)
A secret castle ruin, not crowded. The road goes up from Pichlwang But be careful, Google maps wants to navigate you on the last few kilometres on a quite good, but closed forest road which is forbidden with a car, only bicycles and horses allowed!!!
chetna bhutani (2 years ago)
Beautiful sunset spot and a good trek
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