Neuhaus castle was constructed in the mid-14th century by the House of Stubenberg. Records from 1375 document the name 'Hans from Neuhaus'. Later, the Drachsler family and the counts of Wurmbrand owned the castle. The counts of Wurmbrand reinforced the castle as the Turks threatened the area. Administration of the castle was later relocated to Altschielleiten. Around 1800 the castle was destroyed almost totally by lightning.

Ongoing decay during the next 200 years almost totally destroyed the castle. Only due to the extraordinary strength and thickness of the walls enough substance remained to start a revitalization. Today, the reconstruction of the medieval tower house is almost finished. It is most likely the oldest high-rise building in Styria with a height of 32 metres. Two adjoining buildings are being reconstructed.

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Founded: c. 1350
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Ani Lieb (9 months ago)
Sehr viele tolle Restaurierung..eine sisifuss Arbeit...ein bravissimo all den Helfern und Mitgestalter
Brigitte Menth (10 months ago)
Nice destination.
forever young (14 months ago)
... unfortunately there wasn't much to see!
Angelika Koch (2 years ago)
Wonderful idyllic place with a very nice renovated castle. Unfortunately in private ownership. Would have liked to look at her.
Angelika Koch (2 years ago)
Wonderful idyllic place with a very nice renovated castle. Unfortunately in private ownership. Would have liked to look at her.
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