Schloss Seggau is located on a wooded hill overlooking the town of Leibnitz. The area around Schloss Seggau has been settled since at least the Roman era, as demonstrated by the impressive lapidarium which has survived from that period. The upper castle was built by the Archbishopric of Salzburg in the twelfth century as a base for missions and supervision and this original structure was expanded in 1218 by the bishops of Seckau. Over time, a total of three castles were built: Burg Leibnitz (belonging to the Archbishopric of Salzburg), the castle of the bishops of Seckau, and Schloss Polheim. The castles were completed in their present form under Bishop Johann Ernst, Count of Thun, in the latter half of the seventeenth century. Schloss Seggau was the residence of the bishops until 1786, after which it remained their summer residence until into the twentieth century.

Schloss Seggau now serves as a site for seminars and conferences with a hotel and a Schloss Cafe. The wine cellar is over three hundred years old and offers the opportunity for wine tastings and sales.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kambis Kohansal Vajargah (2 years ago)
Beautiful castle located in the south of Styria, with an interesting religious and historical background. The wine yard is marvelous, but the best part is the extraordinary view over the region. Good for nature lovers as well as hikers.
Johannes (2 years ago)
Cool. Innocativ
Olivia T. (2 years ago)
really nice service and beautiful, spacious rooms. it is about 10 minutes drive away from the train station, making it quite convenient, and a 20 minute walk from Leibnitz. the grounds are beautiful, and the hotel is close to the lake, the river and a vineyard as well. the food isn't bad, but it isn't incredible either. the receptionists were very nice and helpful, offering lots of advice and information. overall a great experience and i would visit again.
Petar Pecanic (3 years ago)
Great place for peacefull and quiet vacation.
Kay-Uwe Wagner (5 years ago)
Incredible place. Very well maintained castle in a beautiful part of the country. Modern and very clean inside. The old wine cellar is a must see. A good gym is however missing.
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