Fleringe Church

Fleringe, Sweden

Fleringe Church dates from the 13th century, and the nave and choir are the oldest parts. Somewhat later during the same century the tower was added. The church has not been substantially altered since, but suffered damage in a heavy fire in 1676.

The church is located in a cemetery surrounded by a low wall in which a remaining medieval lychgate still sits. Outside, the church stables still stand, which is uncommon. The façade of the church itself is adorned with carved portals. Of these, the one in the tower is the most richly decorated.

Inside, nothing remains of the medieval furnishings as they were destroyed in the 1676 fire. The main supporting pillar has a base taken from another, ruined, medieval church in Gann, Gotland. This was probably done because the former base likewise had been damaged by fire. A few fragments of frescos, probably executed by the Master of the Passion of Christ, also survive. The altarpiece is from 1701, the pulpit from 1726 and the pews also from the 18th century. The baptismal font carries the monogram of Christian IV of Denmark and stood originally in the church of Visborg Castle.

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Address

693, Fleringe, Sweden
See all sites in Fleringe

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Piter Pan (8 months ago)
thepleasurekill (2 years ago)
Fin gammal kyrka, mysigt att gå runt och titta.
Ulf Eriksson (3 years ago)
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