The present Endre church was preceded by an older, Romanesque church. Of this church, only the tower, built in the 12th century, remains. A few stone sculptures have also been re-used in the later church, e.g. one sculpture depicting a dragon and another a lion. These are now immured in the southern façade of the church. The rest of the church dates from the 13th century (the choir and sacristy) and the early 14th (the nave). The building material of the church is limestone.

Apart from the aforementioned Romanesque sculptures, the exterior of the church is also adorned with sculpted portals, both Romanesque and Gothic in style.

Internally, the church is decorated with frescos made by the artist known as the Master of the Passion of Christ in the middle of the 15th century. The frescos were uncovered during a renovation in 1915. The church also have several preserved stained glass window panes from the Middle Ages. The altarpiece is furthermore medieval, from the late 14th century, as is a preserved church tabernacle. The triumphal cross dates from circa 1300, and the baptismal font, possibly made by the artist Hegvald, is a Romanesque piece from the 12th century, richly decorated.

The church lies in a cemetery that is surrounded by a low limestone wall, in which a medieval lychgate still survives.

References:

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Address

621, Endre, Sweden
See all sites in Endre

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Annukka Rainio (18 months ago)
Acoustics almost incomprehensible. The choir sounds like music coming from heaven.
Per Blomberg (3 years ago)
Well worth a visit!
sebastian bolander (3 years ago)
Nice church situated on a hill overlooking the field landscape in the west. Next to the church is Endreskola with partly paved woodland where the children can learn how to cycle on the summer holidays when the school is closed.
Anders Glansholm (3 years ago)
The place you have to go to sometimes ❤
Jimmy Öman (4 years ago)
Alltid lugnt o skönt att besöka en kyrka på semestern, svalt o skönt.
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