Lilienfeld Abbey was founded in 1202 by Leopold VI, Duke of Austria and Styria, as a daughter house of Heiligenkreuz Abbey. Successive abbots acted as councillors to the rulers of Austria, and the abbey became wealthy as a result of this valuable connection.

Abbot Matthew Kollweis (1650-1695) turned the monastery into a fortress during the Turkish advance against Vienna in 1683, installing a garrison and giving shelter to a large number of fugitives.

In the 17th century the medieval buildings were extended by Baroque additions. In the first half of the 18th century the tower, library and church interior and furnishings were also refurbished in the Baroque style.

The abbey was suppressed by Emperor Joseph II in 1789, but although the library, archives and portable valuables were removed, on the death of Joseph II it was reopened by Emperor Leopold II as early as 1790.

In 1810 much of the abbey was destroyed in a fire, but was rebuilt under Abbot Johann Ladislaus Pyrker, who later became the Patriarch of Venice (1820-26) and eventually Archbishop of Eger.

As part of his endowment, Duke Leopold VI, Duke of Austria, granted the Abbey lands in and around Pfaffstätten, between Baden and Gumpoldskirchen, upon which the monks erected a walled estate. This estate, the Lilienfelderhof, comprising a gothic church, manor house, and numerous other buildings, was acquired in 2006 by the Kartause Gaming Private Foundation via a 99-year leasehold. The property and its vineyards are currently in the process of being restored and revitalised.

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Founded: 1202
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Barbara Dzino (2 years ago)
Great for an overnight stay! Very welcoming reception and pretty cozy rooms ?
Hannes Höhmüller (2 years ago)
A must see i
Natalia Khilkevitch (2 years ago)
Interesting landmark. Big parking lot behind the Stift.
Dominik Fojtů (3 years ago)
Much enjoyable place to stop and visit! Take the tour - you won't see the library otherwise, and it is a small gem.
Miklos Kozma (3 years ago)
Great concerts, plenty of free parking space. Award winning restaurant in walking distance.
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