Lilienfeld Abbey was founded in 1202 by Leopold VI, Duke of Austria and Styria, as a daughter house of Heiligenkreuz Abbey. Successive abbots acted as councillors to the rulers of Austria, and the abbey became wealthy as a result of this valuable connection.

Abbot Matthew Kollweis (1650-1695) turned the monastery into a fortress during the Turkish advance against Vienna in 1683, installing a garrison and giving shelter to a large number of fugitives.

In the 17th century the medieval buildings were extended by Baroque additions. In the first half of the 18th century the tower, library and church interior and furnishings were also refurbished in the Baroque style.

The abbey was suppressed by Emperor Joseph II in 1789, but although the library, archives and portable valuables were removed, on the death of Joseph II it was reopened by Emperor Leopold II as early as 1790.

In 1810 much of the abbey was destroyed in a fire, but was rebuilt under Abbot Johann Ladislaus Pyrker, who later became the Patriarch of Venice (1820-26) and eventually Archbishop of Eger.

As part of his endowment, Duke Leopold VI, Duke of Austria, granted the Abbey lands in and around Pfaffstätten, between Baden and Gumpoldskirchen, upon which the monks erected a walled estate. This estate, the Lilienfelderhof, comprising a gothic church, manor house, and numerous other buildings, was acquired in 2006 by the Kartause Gaming Private Foundation via a 99-year leasehold. The property and its vineyards are currently in the process of being restored and revitalised.

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Founded: 1202
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Gerhard TERSCH (18 months ago)
Sehr schönes Stift super Führung habe einen Ausflug mit meinen Senioren ins Stift gemacht waren begeistert
Marcelo Almeida Ribeiro (19 months ago)
nice for a visit,and history
Nicola Montepaone (20 months ago)
Un tuffo nel passato! È questa la sensazione che si ha quando si varca la soglia di questo antico monastero...da visitare anche il chiostro con una meravigliosa fontana...il tutto incastonato tra il paesaggio montagnoso dell'Austria.
Werner Bucek (2 years ago)
Not worth a visit
Armen Parsighian (2 years ago)
Wonderful historic church. Spent few months in Lilienfeld. Visited the church on Sundays often.
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