Mauerbach Charterhouse

Mauerbach, Austria

Mauerbach Charterhouse is a former Carthusian monastery. Founded in 1314 by the Austrian duke Frederick the Fair and rebuilt in the 17th and 18th centuries, the Baroque monastic complex is one of the most important structures of its kind in Austria.

The monastery was plundered and set on fire by Ottoman troops during the 1529 Siege of Vienna and suffered further serious structural damage by the 1590 Neulengbach earthquake. Under Abbot Georg Fasel (1616-1631) an intensive rebuilding programme began, finishing in 1660, during which the great majority of the present-day buildings were constructed. The chronicle of the charterhouse written by Abbot Leopold Brenner was available from as early as 1669, but was not printed until 1725. Brenner had lived here from 1641 and made his profession in 1650, and was thus an eye witness of the building of the early Baroque monastery. In 1683 renewed Turkish assaults during the Battle of Vienna caused more destruction, launching a further programme of repairs and refurbishment s which finished only in 1750.

In 1782 the monastery was dissolved as 'non-productive' by Emperor Joseph II during his rationalist reforms and from 1786 the premises were used for the care of the old and incurably ill of the city of Vienna. Many structural alterations were carried out to adapt the buildings to their new function.

In 1944-45 the former monastery was put to use as an emergency hospital. Between 1945 and 1961 the charterhouse was used to house homeless people. During this period the structure was badly neglected, and allowed to fall derelict from exposure to the elements. Since 1984 the complex has housed the workshops of the Bundesdenkmalamt (Monuments Office).

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Details

Founded: 1314
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gregor Nemec (15 months ago)
Historical Ground of Austria
Peter S (2 years ago)
Der jährliche Adventmarkt ist von der Kulisse und den Veranstaltern her einfach sehenswert. Wir kommen regelmäßig seit vielen Jahren. Einfach ein Pflichtbesuch; kleiner, beschaulicher, besinnlicher als die vielen anderen Adventveranstaltungen, Kirche und vorallem das sehr interessante Kloster sind zu jeder Jahreszeit einen Besuch absolut wert.
Sherwin BDSMart (2 years ago)
Amazing place full of great ideas for preservation of historical monuments.
Elena Veliciu (3 years ago)
Is not what do you expeact is more ....must go for understand
Reinhard Bauer (3 years ago)
Awesome historical place for seminars and education about the old materials we used to work with in buildings and construction. Did a seminar there for the conservation and restoring of old wooden windows .
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