Seitenstetten Abbey

Seitenstetten, Austria

Seitenstetten Abbey was founded in 1112 by Udalschalk, a relative of Bishop Ulrich of Passau, to which he gave all his estates as an endowment. In 1114 the new foundation was settled by monks from Göttweig Abbey. Bishop Ulrich dedicated the church in 1116 and granted the abbey the large parish of Aschbach. In 1142 it also received the large parish of Wolfsbach. Out of these two original parishes were formed the fourteen modern parishes for which the abbey is still responsible.

Despite many setbacks, including two serious fires and many disputes over property, the abbey gradually developed. In 1347 the community had 22 members. After a lengthy period of decline Abbot Benedikt I, formerly prior of the Schottenstift in Vienna, introduced the Melk Reforms at Seitenstetten, thus bringing about a revival in its spiritual and cultural life. This abbot had a chapel built and dedicated in 1440 on the Sonntagberg and so established the Sonntagberger Pilgrimage under the control and protection of the abbey.

Thereafter the abbey was hard hit by the Hungarian disturbances associated with Matthias Corvinus, the Turkish taxes and above all the Reformation; the number of monks declined sharply.

Abbot Christoph Held (1572-1602) started the beginning of spiritual revival with the powerful support of the Imperial Council. Under the abbots that followed, the monastery got its Baroque appearance. After the Thirty Years' War did Abbot Gabriel Sauer (1648-74) finally succeed in stabilising the abbey economically and then in bringing about a true religious renewal.

Abbot Benedikt II Abelzhauser (1687-1717) commissioned Jakob Prandtauer to build the magnificent Pilgrimage Church of the Holy Trinity on the Sonntagberg. The early Gothic abbey church was lavishly refurbished, including work by Franz Joseph Feuchtmayer. Between 1718 and 1747 the Baroque conventual buildings that still stand today were constructed. Ceiling frescoes in the Marble Hall (1735) and the library (1740) were painted by Paul Troger.

After the difficulties of the anti-monastic policies of Emperor Joseph II and of the Napoleonic wars, the abbey gradually regained its strength through the 19th century, until the time of Abbot Theodor Springer (1920-58), who not only brought the abbey safely through the economic crisis after World War I but also through the National Socialist period and World War II without its being dissolved, as so many other monasteries were.

Besides the major works of art and architecture mentioned previously, there are also the Romanesque Knights' Chapel, the picture gallery, and the garden, which contains about 110 different types of rose, mostly historical.

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Details

Founded: 1112
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Szucs (3 years ago)
Nagyon szép gótikus katolikus templom bencés rendházzal
Katrin Elisabeth Fuchslueger (3 years ago)
Das Kloster ist sehr schön gelegen! Der Klostergarten ist traumhaft schön und wird mit viel Liebe gepflegt. An den Gartentagen ist der Andrang groß. Man kann viele verschiedene Pflanzen und Kräuter im Klosterladen kaufen. Für Verpflegung ist im Gasthaus "Der Stiftsmeierhof" gesorgt.
Reinhard Braunstein (3 years ago)
Ein schönes Stift und ein sehr schöner Stift Garten, toll zum chillen und Relaxen. Allerdings sollte man mit dem Garten warten bis die Blumen blühen und das Wetter passt. Dann fällt einem das Heimgehen schon schwer.
Christine Artmayr (3 years ago)
Schöne Zimmer in Klostertrakt. Gutes Essen und freundliche Mitarbeiter. Abt Petrus ist ein sehr umgänglicher Mensch.
Kimberly Lisiak (6 years ago)
A fantastic place to stay! Lovely people, holy people.
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