South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology

Bolzano, Italy

South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology was specifically established in 1998 to house 'Ötzi', a well-preserved natural mummy of a man from about 3300 BC. This is the world's oldest natural human mummy. It has offered an unprecedented view of Chalcolithic (Copper Age) European culture. The world's oldest complete copper age axe was found among his extensive equipment which also comprised a rather complex fire lighting kit and a quiver loaded with twelve arrows, only two of which were finished, clothing and a flint knife complete with its sheath.

The body is held in a climate controlled chamber within the museum at a temperature of -6 Celsius and 98% humidity, replicating glacier conditions in which it was found. Along with original finds there are models, reconstructions and multimedia presentations showing Ötzi in the context of the early history of the southern Alpine region.

Converted from a 19th-century bank building, the museum covers the history and archaeology of the southern Alpine region from the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic (15,000 B.C.) up to 800 A.D. In 2006, the museum hosted an exhibition on the mummies of the Chachapoyas culture.

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Address

Via Museo 43, Bolzano, Italy
See all sites in Bolzano

Details

Founded: 1998
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bernd Lehahn (12 months ago)
A MUST see in Bozen - This museum has a single topic (Ötzi), but manages to present this topic in a very diverse and interesting way. It is incredibly fascinating to see a lot of different areas of science all contribute to the knowledge about this single person. Truly one of the most interesting museums I have been to.
K - (12 months ago)
Family-friendly design makes this museum one of the best I have ever visited. You spiral up a sloping walkway as you travel back through history to discovery how the world has changed since the Ötzi man's heyday. Good lightning and signage make for an informative visit with a great ambience.
Jonathan Harris (12 months ago)
Fascinating museum that covers a wide range of topics all related to Ötzi. In addition, there is a comfy lounge room filled with soft bed-like furniture you can relax on at the end.
Heleen Raes (12 months ago)
This is a fun museum about Ötzi, you learn a lot. It’s €9 for adults but free if you have a museum pass. I would recommend making a reservation, we did not have one and waited over an hour to get in on a Sunday morning.
Aimee K (15 months ago)
We thoroughly enjoyed our visit to the museum to learn more about Ötzi. The museum is very well done. Entertaining and informative for all ages. The entrance fees are very reasonable.
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