Fort Kosmač was the southernmost fortress in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, guarding the southern extremity of the border between the empire and Montenegro. It is situated near Brajići village, on a hilltop overlooking the road between Budva on the coast and Cetinje, the Montenegrin capital at the time. Constructed in the 1840s, it was attacked during an 1869 rebellion and was garrisoned by Austrian troops until the fall of the empire in 1918. After passing to the newly established Yugoslavia, it was garrisoned again by Italian troops for a period in the Second World War. 

The fort is now in a ruinous condition; it once had three storeys, but the topmost storey has collapsed entirely, leaving it roofless. The interior walls, floors and central staircase have also collapsed. Although the remains of the main staircase are still visible, the steps have disappeared entirely and the upper level cannot be reached, though there is nothing left of the upper floor to stand on in any case.

The interior of the fort is strewn with large quantities of fallen masonry, completely obscuring the original floor level. The extent of the collapse is so complete that it is no longer known how the interior was originally laid out. There are substantial holes in the interior's vaulted ceiling. The exterior has been subjected to some stone-robbing in pursuit of the finely-worked square blocks of grey limestone that were used to line the fort's outer walls.

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Budva, Montenegro
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Founded: 1840s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Montenegro

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Jefferson (2 months ago)
Easy to find. Park by the gate and walk up the old path. Tremendous views from the castle over to the coast. The inside is crumbling and probably not the safest but interesting to see and feel the atmosphere. Definitely worth visiting if you are in the area!
Natalie Shkliar (3 months ago)
Easy 10-minute walk once you’ve parked at the bottom (Google gives the correct location), accessible to children. We enjoyed the views, visited in March and there was no one else there.
Tamir Nichansky (3 months ago)
Cool, not an easy access - best sunset in montenegro
Тимур (8 months ago)
Absolutely amazing, picturesque and charming ruins for those who love things like that.
Konrad Marfurt (11 months ago)
Beautiful views. Be careful while Roaming the area.
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