Castellano Castle

Castellano, Italy

The Castle of Castellano is a fortified manor house built around 1000, located in the village of Castellano, in the municipality of Villa Lagarina.

It is one of the most famous castles of Vallagarina, offering a panorama of the entire valley. Owned by numerous noble families, of which the most important was the Lodron, it was later transformed into an Austrian-Hungarian fortress in World War I.

It once housed frescoes, now preserved in the Civic Museum of Rovereto.

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Founded: c. 1000 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bruno Pruha (2 years ago)
Striking with a breathtaking view of the valley. The outdoor theater is a jewel.
Pietro TheMad (2 years ago)
It can only be visited externally as it is a private property and also inhabited. From the outside we see that the maintenance leaves much to be desired probably the noble family remained without money.
Giacomo Castellan (2 years ago)
Nice
Paolo Rizzoli (2 years ago)
Visto dall'esterno, bel monumento.
Fabrizio Brunetti (2 years ago)
Bellissimo Castello...ne vale veramente la pena una visita
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