Drena Castle

Drena, Italy

The well-preserved Drena Castle ruins stands on the rock overlooking the deep gorge of the Salagoni River. Built in the 12th century, Drena was probably erected over a prehistoric village. During the Middle Ages, the castle became an important stronghold to control the road connecting Trento and Lake Garda. Unassailable from the flames, the castle is defended by two rows of walls and has been constructed in a dominating position over a gorge - rendering it impregnable to the techniques in use at the time. The castle is mostly Romanesque, but includes a number of Gothic features and 16th century structures.

Frequently contended, in 1703 Drena castle was destroyed by French troops led by General Vendome as well as practically all the castles in the area.

Recently refurbished, Castel Drena can be visited throughout the year, and uses to host numerous cultural events, as well as a permanent exhibition. Overlooking the complex is the 25 metres high fourteenth-century tower, the top of which affords a view over the evocative Marocche stone quarry.

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Address

Via al Castello, Drena, Italy
See all sites in Drena

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fotograf a kameraman Tomáš Michna (6 months ago)
Nice place for a wedding. If you need a photographer just let me know :)
Petr Brezina (11 months ago)
Nice place with an amazing view of 120 steps to the top of the tower. ?
Manuel Mustermann (13 months ago)
Amazing view. Definitely worth a visit. The restaurant accessible by the street "via castello" near the castle is amazing too.
Adam Bojanowski (2 years ago)
Complex from 10th century (with various modifications). You can enter the tower with an outstanding view and see excavated objects from the archeological site of castle Drena. I don't remember the opening hours but during summer the access is until 6 PM. Entrance fee is 2-4€.
ruth Moody (2 years ago)
Super castle. Don't miss climbing up the tallest tower... The entrance is not well marked and easily missed, but well worth the climb up for an awesome view.
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