Palazzo Chiericati

Vicenza, Italy

The Palazzo Chiericati is a Renaissance palace in Vicenza, designed by Andrea Palladio for the Count Girolamo Chiericati. The architect started building the palace in 1550, and some further work was completed under the patronage of Chiericati's son, Valerio. However, the palazzo was not fully finished until about 1680, possibly by Carlo Borella.

The palazzo was built in an area called which housed the wood and cattle market. At that time, it was an islet surrounded by the Retrone and Bacchiglione streams, and to protect the structure from the frequent floods, Palladio designed it on an elevated position: the entrance could be accessed by a triple Classic-style staircase.

The palazzo's principal façade is composed of three bays, the central bay projecting slightly. The two end bays have logge on the piano nobile level, while the central bay is closed. The façade has two superimposed orders of columns, Tuscan on the lower level with Ionic above. The roofline is decorated by statuary.

Palazzo Chiericati, along with the other Palladian buildings of Vicenza, is part of a World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Details

Founded: 1550-1680
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ella Reznikov (5 months ago)
Beautiful impressive
Rob Brokenhouse (5 months ago)
nice people dancing on Saturday morning
Sofija Sofija (7 months ago)
Unfortunatly palace wasnt completly open but the part we viseted was great.
Mutinta Bbenkele (16 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful space. We had an event as part of the Vicenza International Poetry Festival. The existence of music, art and poetry for the day was a cacophony of amazing cross disciplinary art. I loved It!
Júlia Miranda (18 months ago)
Small but nice exibition. The museum is pleasant from the inside and also very pretty from the outside. We actually just went because we bought the combo ticket with the Olympic theatre, but it was quite worth the visit. We took a bit over an hour to see the whole collection (not reading everything).
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