Palazzo Chiericati

Vicenza, Italy

The Palazzo Chiericati is a Renaissance palace in Vicenza, designed by Andrea Palladio for the Count Girolamo Chiericati. The architect started building the palace in 1550, and some further work was completed under the patronage of Chiericati's son, Valerio. However, the palazzo was not fully finished until about 1680, possibly by Carlo Borella.

The palazzo was built in an area called which housed the wood and cattle market. At that time, it was an islet surrounded by the Retrone and Bacchiglione streams, and to protect the structure from the frequent floods, Palladio designed it on an elevated position: the entrance could be accessed by a triple Classic-style staircase.

The palazzo's principal façade is composed of three bays, the central bay projecting slightly. The two end bays have logge on the piano nobile level, while the central bay is closed. The façade has two superimposed orders of columns, Tuscan on the lower level with Ionic above. The roofline is decorated by statuary.

Palazzo Chiericati, along with the other Palladian buildings of Vicenza, is part of a World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Details

Founded: 1550-1680
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

SWA TIM (2 years ago)
Exelent places !!!
MV (3 years ago)
I completely agree with a previous review... Great artwork but being shadowed by frowning staff throughout the whole visit was a little off-putting.
Julia Jackson (3 years ago)
Be sure to read the history and connection to Pallido. I dream of having an attic like this one along with the collection in the basement. Great job protecting artifacts from the area!
Alexandru Cristian Beșliu (3 years ago)
Palazzo Chiericati is probably in the top 3 main attractions in Vicenza (alongside the Teatro Olimpico and the Basilica Palladiana), and for good reasons. The peculiar outer appearance with the deep logias makes for one of the most interesting urban artefacts in the city while, at the interior, the palazzo houses a marvelous collection of art in permanent and temporary exhibitions.
Tom Hettich (3 years ago)
Although converted to museum use still get a feeling for the original design intent as a palace, one of the more complete palladian designs in the town center.
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