Padua Synagogue

Padua, Italy

The Italian Synagogue of Padua is the only synagogue in city still in use from the Renaissance through World War II. It was built in 1584 and restored in 1581, 1631, 1830, and 1865. It was closed in 1892 when the community built a modern synagogue, but reopened after the war because in 1943 fascists burned the modern synagogue.

The synagogue is located in the historic ghetto. The baroque synagogue measures 18 by 7 meters. As is usual in Italian synagogues, the Bimah and Torah Ark are located at opposite sides of the room, with the space in between left vacant to accommodate the processional. What is unusual about the synagogue at Padua is that the Ark and Bimah are placed on the synagogues's long walls.

The baroque, sixteenth century Torah Ark is made from the wood of a plane tree that was struck down by lightning in the University's famous botanical garden. It features gilded doors, four Corinthian columns made of black marble with white veining, and carved foliage. The balduchin is in the form of a broken pediment.

The ceiling is coffered and painted. The area between the Torah Ark and Bimah is a coffered barrel vault, with large, heavily-carved baroque rosettes in each recess.

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Details

Founded: 1584
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chiara D'Ascenzo (15 months ago)
Si tratta dell unica sinagoga rimasta delke varie presenti nel ghetto padovano. La sinagoga é visitabile attraverso il museo ebraico. La visita guidata é fatta benissimo, vengono spiegati elementi riguardanti l ebraismo in generale e la storia degli ebrei padovanj nello specifico. Se si è interessati di storia ebraica vale sicuramente la pena.
Dolores Raspadori (17 months ago)
simplice yao sery (18 months ago)
Daniele Coen (2 years ago)
Bella davvero
Tommaso Piovesan (4 years ago)
Luogo di culto molto interessante dal punto di vista storico. Consigliatissimo se visitato con una guida
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