Villa Chiericati

Vancimuglio, Italy

Villa Chiericati was designed for Giovanni Chiericati by the architect Andrea Palladio in the early 1550s. In 1996 UNESCO included the villa in the World Heritage Site City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto.

The villa is square and a portico projects from its principal facade. The principal rooms are built upon a piano nobile above a semi-basement. The upper floor is very much of secondary importance. The design of the villa was to be the prototype for Palladio's later works at the Villa Rotonda and the Villa Malcontenta.

Work on the villa stopped after the death of Palladio's client. It was not finally completed until after it had been purchased by Ludovico Porto in 1574. In 1584 he employed the architect Domenico Groppino, who had collaborated with Palladio on other projects, to complete the villa.There is some debate as to the extent Groppino influenced the eventual design of the building. While the portico is undoubtedly by the hand of Palladio himself, the position of the windows is at variance with the architect's own advice in I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura, where he warns against placing windows near the corner of a building lest it weaken the structure (the villa does in fact reveal signs of settlement here).

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Details

Founded: 1550s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

mattia fiore (14 months ago)
Too bad it's in abandonment
Antonio Pistore (20 months ago)
Palladian villa not large in size but majestic and elegant in appearance; the facade is characterized by a pronaos with ionic colonnade, all advanced compared to the perimeter wall. The effect is spectacular, even more accentuated by the open position in the middle of the countryside. I attach a photo from 1980
Andrea Dalla Libera (21 months ago)
alessandro cabbia (2 years ago)
Private residence with a very well kept park
Ivan Vergine (2 years ago)
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