Villa Saraceno has been dated to the 1540s, which makes it one of Andrea Palladio's earlier works. In 1570 the building was illustrated in an imagined state in its architect's influential publication 'Four Books of Architecture'. 

Villa Saraceno is one of Palladio's simpler creations. Like most of Palladio's villas it combines living space for its upper-class owners with space for uses related to agriculture. Above the piano nobile is a floor which was designed as a granary. As it stands today, the villa has a nineteenth-century wing which links it to a fifteenth-century building.

The villa fell into a poor state of repair in the twentieth century but retained some of its original frescoes. It was acquired in 1989 by the British charity the Landmark Trust. By 1994 the Trust had completed its restoration, converting the property, which includes adjacent farm-buildings not by Palladio, into a holiday home sleeping up to 16 people. The many people who have since stayed in the villa include Witold Rybczynski, who used it as a base when researching his book on Palladio.

The restoration has been praised for its sensitivity, and since 1996 the villa has enjoyed an additional level of protection, being conserved as one of the buildings which make up the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'.

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Address

Via Finale, Agugliaro, Italy
See all sites in Agugliaro

Details

Founded: 1540s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Silvana Di Matteo (16 months ago)
Era chiusa
Paddy Freeland (2 years ago)
Spectacular
Mike Dahlin (2 years ago)
Fantastic landmark trust property. Great place to stay. Not sure I would go far out of my way just to visit during open hours.
Michele Ferroni (2 years ago)
Splendido esempio di conservazione del patrimonio artistico. La villa ha mantenuto lo spirito, il sapore, il fascino e l'atmosfera del passato. Bravo Landmark Trust, well done!! Da vedere.
James Gooding (2 years ago)
A wonderful place to stay with a group of 15 people
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