Tempio Voltiano

Como, Italy

The Tempio Voltiano is a museum in the city of Como, Italy that is dedicated to Alessandro Volta, a prolific scientist and the inventor of the electrical battery. Volta was born in Como in 1745, held his first professorship there until 1779, and retired to Como in 1819.

The neoclassical building was designed by Federico Frigerio (1873–1959). It was completed in 1927 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the scientist's death, but it was inaugurated only in 1928. It hosts a collection of scientific instruments used by the physicist including his early voltaic piles (batteries). The first floor has a display of his personal belongings and his awards.

It is one of the most visited museums in town. The temple was featured on the back of the 10,000 lire banknote, while Volta's portrait was depicted on the front of the same banknote. Banknotes based on the Italian lira have since been replaced by notes denominated in Euros.

In the nearbies of the Tempio Voltiano, there are the new statue of Daniel Libeskind named Life Electric and the Faro Voltiano. both dedicated to Volta.

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Details

Founded: 1927
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kim Davis (15 months ago)
Beautiful park area by the lake shore.
Adventure LTD (16 months ago)
So beautiful . Just can't get enough of it .
Shaun Hughes (16 months ago)
This museum was full of really cool stuff.
Loran Aniseed (16 months ago)
The 2 stars are for the lovely park in the area with lots of trees and shade, and lovely exterior of the building. The interior is small and dark-ish with not much to learn or view, a bit sad-looking to be honest. Not worth for the £4 entry fee, spent less than 10' inside.
M C (2 years ago)
Truly disappointing. The outside of the building is stunning but very little to see inside and most of it is reconstructed. Top gallery closed but no info about it and ticket price still a full 4€. Waste of money entering.
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