Tempio Voltiano

Como, Italy

The Tempio Voltiano is a museum in the city of Como, Italy that is dedicated to Alessandro Volta, a prolific scientist and the inventor of the electrical battery. Volta was born in Como in 1745, held his first professorship there until 1779, and retired to Como in 1819.

The neoclassical building was designed by Federico Frigerio (1873–1959). It was completed in 1927 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the scientist's death, but it was inaugurated only in 1928. It hosts a collection of scientific instruments used by the physicist including his early voltaic piles (batteries). The first floor has a display of his personal belongings and his awards.

It is one of the most visited museums in town. The temple was featured on the back of the 10,000 lire banknote, while Volta's portrait was depicted on the front of the same banknote. Banknotes based on the Italian lira have since been replaced by notes denominated in Euros.

In the nearbies of the Tempio Voltiano, there are the new statue of Daniel Libeskind named Life Electric and the Faro Voltiano. both dedicated to Volta.

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Details

Founded: 1927
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Diana Dumitru (5 months ago)
The architecture of the museum is beautiful, but there is a bit of missed potential in terms of using this beautiful space.
Mubasher Sian (6 months ago)
Beautiful place to visit. Relax and enjoy.Along side lake. Surrounding Mountains, excellent beauty to see.
Gurudas Kar (6 months ago)
Lake Como is one of most beautiful place in Italy.
Luke (7 months ago)
A nice building inside is a bit confusing with a lack of information. The location with the walk around it and the views and small beach next to it is is the best bit.
Peter Goodhew (9 months ago)
Alessandro Volta is clearly revered in Como, and rightly so. The Tempio is like a mini-Pantheon and is a stunning building in a stunning location. There is a historical timeline around the upper gallery which is in Italian but there is an English language guide which covers the main story. The lower floor contains real and replica examples of his experimental equipment. This could have been really interesting but there were no descriptions (in any language) of the equipment and what it was used for. This is a vast wasted opportunity. A friendly guide came across to me when I was about half-way round and lent me an English-language booklet which just listed the exhibits, without explaining them. The whole museum is a lost educational opportunity: no non-physicist would come out wiser than when they entered!
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