Tempio Voltiano

Como, Italy

The Tempio Voltiano is a museum in the city of Como, Italy that is dedicated to Alessandro Volta, a prolific scientist and the inventor of the electrical battery. Volta was born in Como in 1745, held his first professorship there until 1779, and retired to Como in 1819.

The neoclassical building was designed by Federico Frigerio (1873–1959). It was completed in 1927 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the scientist's death, but it was inaugurated only in 1928. It hosts a collection of scientific instruments used by the physicist including his early voltaic piles (batteries). The first floor has a display of his personal belongings and his awards.

It is one of the most visited museums in town. The temple was featured on the back of the 10,000 lire banknote, while Volta's portrait was depicted on the front of the same banknote. Banknotes based on the Italian lira have since been replaced by notes denominated in Euros.

In the nearbies of the Tempio Voltiano, there are the new statue of Daniel Libeskind named Life Electric and the Faro Voltiano. both dedicated to Volta.

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Details

Founded: 1927
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frank Simpson (14 months ago)
I was amped to see it, shocked my partner for sure. Currently one of the best places to see, nothing negative to say.
habib ur rehman (16 months ago)
This is my 1st visit in Como Italy. Fantastic place for vistor markets restaurants everything is available for fun. Boats and charter plane is also available in Como to make your journey fantastic .
Doriana V (18 months ago)
Neoclassical "temple" of Alessandro Volta, who was born here in Como, pioneer of electricity and power, inventor of the electric battery and the discoverer of methane. You can get in the museum only with reservation!
Mike Arm (2 years ago)
Good but overcrowded. Also the shops open after 10.00 maybe because I was there at Saturday
Diana Dumitru (2 years ago)
The architecture of the museum is beautiful, but there is a bit of missed potential in terms of using this beautiful space.
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