San Nicolò Church

Lecco, Italy

The Basilica of San Nicolò is a Roman Catholic minor basilica church located in the town of Lecco. A church at the site was present by the 11th century. It has undergone a cycle of damage and reconstruction until the 17th century, when it garnered Baroque elements and decoration.

Between 1831 and 1862, the architect Giuseppe Bovara altered the facade and decoration to the Neoclassical tastes. The imposing, neo-gothic bell-tower was added in 1902–1904, designed by Giovanni Ceruti. The bell tower was erected at the site of one of the turrets in the medieval walls of the city, razed during the 19th century. The double staircase entrance was added in 1928.

The interiors houses a number of frescoes including the Life of Jesus (1881) on the walls by Casimiro Radice and the Glory of the Madonna of the Rosary (1925) on the ceiling by Luigi Morgari. The fifth chapel on the right nave contains 14th-century frescoes and a 16th-century baptismal font.

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Address

Via San Nicolò 1, Lecco, Italy
See all sites in Lecco

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rafał Kubik (3 years ago)
Lecco , very nice place
Alba Chiara (3 years ago)
Beautiful
Pascal Bordais (3 years ago)
Beautiful. Must view on the walk...
Laura Arland (4 years ago)
Nice small city with a few sightseeings
Gokulraja Murugesan (5 years ago)
Gorgeous and beautiful structure. A divine place.
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