Zograf Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

The Holy Monastery of Zographou (or Zograf) is located on the southwestern side of the Athos Peninsula in northern Greece. The monastery is dedicated to St. George. According to tradition, the monastery was founded during the 10th century by three Bulgarian brothers, the monks Moses, Aaron, and John from Ohrid. While the monastery initially was inhabited by Bulgarian, Greek, and Serbian monks, since 1845 the monks are only Bulgarians. Zographou is ranked ninth in the hierarchical order of the twenty monasteries located on the Mount Athos peninsula.

The earliest record of the Zographou is from 980. During its early years the monastery was well supported by Bulgarian rulers, especially Ivan Asen II and Ivan Alexander. Zographou also received land endowments from the Byzantine emperors and Serbian and Romanian rulers.

As were many of the Athonite monasteries at the time Zographou suffered from raids by the pirates in the Mediterranean Sea, especially during the 13th century when the peninsula was ruled by Frankish forces after they had conquered Constantinople in 1204. In 1275, Catalan pirates made a major raid for plunder on the monastery, a raid in which 26 monks were killed and the monastery burnt down. Reconstruction of the buildings started later in the century, aided financially by Emperor Adronicus II Palaeologus.

Further major construction in the monastery began in the 16th century, with many of the existing buildings dating from the middle of the 18th century. The south and east wings were built in 1750 and 1758 respectively. A small church was built in 1764 and a larger one in 1801. The north and west wings were built in late 19th century and with the construction of the Ss. Cyril and Methodius Church and bell tower major construction was completed in 1896.

At present all monks in the monastery are Bulgarian, and all services are in Church Slavonic.

The collection in the monastery library preserves a significant presentation of Bulgarian culture. It contains manuscripts from the 14th and 15th centuries, including copies of the passionals of Naum of Ohrid and St. Petka. Additionally, the library contains 388 manuscripts in Slavic and 126 in Greek, as well as some 10,000 printed books.

The monastery also has two miraculous icons of St. George as well as icons of the Virgin of Akathistos and the Virgin Epakouousa. In addition, the monastery has other heirlooms and ecclesiastical vessels.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Founded: 10th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ingus Bukšs (11 months ago)
High risk of becoming orthodox ? ⛪
Andrea Pandulis (2 years ago)
I have no words to describe the spirit of that Holly place. Once you visit you will be comeback again and again.
Kristian Krastev (2 years ago)
An Unique Bulgarian monastery on Athos Peninsula. Only men can visit it with Visa confirmation.
Vassil Chulov (2 years ago)
Bulgarian monastery on the easternmost arm of the Halkidiki peninsula. One of the most beautiful and calm monastery I've ever visited. Many rules must be followed if you like to visit! The start point is from Ouronupoly.
Nikolay Tantchev (2 years ago)
It's a place where you need to visit because can't be explained otherwise. That was my first visit but it will not be the last. I have met a lot of good peoples out there. God bless all who are providing for this place to have it operational.
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