Konstamonitou Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

The Kastamonitou Monastery, officially called Konstamonitou, is an Orthodox Christian monastery in the monastic state of Mount Athos in Greece. It stands on the southeastern side of the Athos peninsula. The monastery ranks twentieth and last in the hierarchy of the Athonite monasteries.

The monastery was founded in the mid-11th century, either by an unknown member of the aristocratic Byzantine Kastamonites family, or by an unrelated person hailing from the area of Kastamon in Paphlagonia. It is dedicated to Saint Stephen. Its history during the Byzantine period is obscure, and until the 14th century it appears to have been a moderate establishment. After it was destroyed in a fire in the 1420s and restored by the Serbian magnate Radič, it attracted many monks from the South Slavic lands, and experienced a century of prosperity.

The monastery's present buildings date to the 18th and 19th centuries. The monastery has about 20 working monks. The monastery library holds 110 manuscripts and approximately 5,000 printed books.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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User Reviews

Π. Νικόλαος Καπνιάς (19 months ago)
Διαφέρει από τις περισσότερες Αγιορείτικες μονές.
Nikos Mariolis (19 months ago)
Αυθεντική μονή που βασίζεται στην απλότητα και στην μοναστηριακή ζωή. Μοναχοί κοντά στους επισκέπτες. Αρνητικό σημείο για τους "επισκέπτες" η έλλειψη ηλεκτρικού ρεύματος και μπανιων.
Άκης Πάνου (19 months ago)
ΈΧΟΥΝ ΕΝΑΝ ΘΕΟΠΑΛΑΒΟ ΠΟΥ ΤΟΝ ΛΕΝΕ ΠΑΪΣΙΟ.
Эд Кос (20 months ago)
Heavenly place
Amvro o Megas (2 years ago)
Η ΑΠΛΌΤΗΤΑ ΣΤΟ ΜΕΓΑΛΕΙΟ ΤΗΣ!!!
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