Konstamonitou Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

The Kastamonitou Monastery, officially called Konstamonitou, is an Orthodox Christian monastery in the monastic state of Mount Athos in Greece. It stands on the southeastern side of the Athos peninsula. The monastery ranks twentieth and last in the hierarchy of the Athonite monasteries.

The monastery was founded in the mid-11th century, either by an unknown member of the aristocratic Byzantine Kastamonites family, or by an unrelated person hailing from the area of Kastamon in Paphlagonia. It is dedicated to Saint Stephen. Its history during the Byzantine period is obscure, and until the 14th century it appears to have been a moderate establishment. After it was destroyed in a fire in the 1420s and restored by the Serbian magnate Radič, it attracted many monks from the South Slavic lands, and experienced a century of prosperity.

The monastery's present buildings date to the 18th and 19th centuries. The monastery has about 20 working monks. The monastery library holds 110 manuscripts and approximately 5,000 printed books.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Mount Athos, Greece
See all sites in Mount Athos

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pencho Mihnev (13 months ago)
Holy Monastery of St. Stephen. Great monastery, great monks!
Andriy Dudchenko (16 months ago)
They were not friendly, unfortunately, when we came for a brief visit. The main church is under reconstruction. May they have a spirit of Christian hospitality.
Lallos Konstantinos (16 months ago)
Genuine Orthodox Christian experience.Very friendly,knowledgeable,discerning,and hospitable Monks
Antonios Mich. (2 years ago)
Authentic monastery of Mount Athos without luxuries and without hotel facilities, hospitable for all those who visit it, it is really worth it !!
Panagiotis Settas (2 years ago)
The "struggle" of the monks is daily!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.