Xenophontos Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

The Xenophontos Monastery is one of the twenty monasteries located on the peninsula of Mount Athos in northeastern Greece. The monastery is on southwestern side of the peninsula near St. Panteleimon's Monastery. Xenophontos ranks sixteenth in the hierarchical order on Mount Athos.

First mention of the founding of a monastery was in 998, while the monk Xenophon is credited with building the monastery that bears his name in 1010. After the fall of Constantinople, Xenophontos began a period of hard times as the monastery was alternatively destroyed by pirates and rebuilt. Each time rulers from eastern Europe would fund rebuilding efforts. Such attacks continued until the 18th century.

In the 16th century a katholikon was built near the entrance to the monastery in the southern part of the monastery precinct and dedicated to St. George the Trophybearer. This church featured frescos painted by Antonius of the Cretan school. In the 18th century the monastery began to prosper again and a new katholikon was built. It was also restored between 1817 and 1837. This church remains the largest katholikon on the Holy Mount. This building was located in the northern part of the monastery precinct.

Within the monastery precincts there are eight chapels. Two of these are associated with the old katholikon where the chapels of St. Demetrios and St. Lazaros are within the katholikon. The other six, St. John the Theologian, St. Euphemia, Ss. Cosmos and Damian, the Dormition of of the Virgin, the Presentation of the Virgin, and St. Stephen, are outside it. There are also six chapels outside the precincts of the monastery. Additionally, the skete of the Annunciation or Xenophontos belong to the monastery.

The library of Xenophontos contains over 4,000 printed books and some 300 manuscripts.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Founded: 10th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaroslav Strelkovskyy (2 months ago)
Beitiful place. Be sure to visit it.
Felix P. (15 months ago)
Amazing monastery. Once can really feel the presence of God there. The monks are very spiritual and friendly towards pilgrims. The hospitality is beyond expectations.
Felix P. (15 months ago)
Amazing monastery. Once can really feel the presence of God there. The monks are very spiritual and friendly towards pilgrims. The hospitality is beyond expectations.
Ioannis Paisis (2 years ago)
A lovely monastery in Agios Orios. You can visit it by boat quite easily.
Ioannis Paisis (2 years ago)
A lovely monastery in Agios Orios. You can visit it by boat quite easily.
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