La Tour de Villa Castle

Gressan, Italy

Originally, La Tour de Villa castle was comprised almost entirely of the central tower. The restoration works did not re-build the western part and the northern part, leaving instead a beautiful court yard with views over the plain. Today, the complex is made up of two well-distinct parts: one part is the 12th century tower and the other inhabited part is a semi-circular structure which dates back to the 15th century.

The tower, which has a square base, stands in the centre of the buildings situated on a rock which emerges from the ground. Long chocks are placed at the base of the walls, especially in the corners. Two doors both situated on the north side open externally: the original door has a height of 7.40m with a solid frame, the other, which is accessed via a double staircase, was opened during the restoration works of the 19th century. On the inside, the tower is divided into three floors with a wooden granary accessed by a spiral staircase. The roof of the tower is a lead platform, with battlements and a magnificent viewpoint.

The living area, which has double windows of exquisite workmanship, is spread over three floors. The following rooms are of particular interest: the reception room with its monumental hall, the Chapel, in which the paintings were due to the Artari, the hall of arms, where all the crests of the main noble families of the Aosta Valley are displayed, surmounted by the crest of the House of Savoy.

This castle was built by the Lords of La Tour de Villa. The ancestor of this lineage was Guido, cited in a pact sanctioning his alliance with the Count of Savoy for the storming of the fort of Bard in 1242. The last male descendant of the lineage was Grat Philibert de La Tour who died in 1693. The family crest is a golden lion, with red claws and tongue, rearing up on a black shield, accompanied by the motto Praecibus et Operibus (with prayers and work). The castle then was passed by inheritance to the Aymoniers and Carrels and was used for the charity fund of the Saint Laurent parish in Aosta.

Falling into ruin, the castle was sold in 1864 to a certain Vincent Carlin, who sold it, in turn, in 1885, to the Bishop of Aosta of the era, Auguste Duc, who restored it and made it his summer residence. In 1921, it was passed to the Gerbore barons of Saint-Nicolas and since 1945, has belonged to a family of Milan.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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User Reviews

Valentino Bisi (9 months ago)
Family welcome that warms you and makes you forget the winter cold. Wonderful panorama, suggestive and well-kept environment, excellent hygiene and cleanliness. Cristina offers you every comfort and valuable advice, our experience lasted 10 and our 3 year old daughter enjoyed the snow and the castle. Super recommended!
Andrea Mariotti (11 months ago)
An enchanting place: the suggestion of the castle undoubtedly makes your stay here an unforgettable experience and certainly worth repeating; the six days spent there went well beyond our expectations because Cristina, in addition to being a perfect castellana, is a truly special person: her way of doing things is as delicate as it is essential to make you feel "at home" immediately. For us it was like knowing her forever and her castle a nest where to take refuge to find balance and well-being.
Operations Manager (2 years ago)
Chateau La Tour de Villa truly one of a kind experience. This Castle has such a magical feeling about it and is in perfect condition. The owner is very friendly and supportive. Great place for family photos and visiting the surrounding area. Highly recommended especially if your driving through Italy and need a good place to spend the night or several days.
Simone Imbimbo (3 years ago)
Spettacolare come la sua proprietaria, gentile, disponibile e premurosa. Colazione sontuosa ma non esagerata. B&B di lusso ma vale ogni singolo centesimo. Vista meravigliosa sulla valle centrale. Purtroppo per i week end bisogna prenotare con mesi in anticipo. Organizzano anche eventi e affittano lo spazio per Matrimoni o eventi aziendali. Consigliatissimo per un tuffo nella storia e qualche giorno di relax in una location fantastica.
Giancarlo Marino (4 years ago)
Stupendo il castello, ottimo posto, un weekend bellissimo.
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