Santa Maria Church

Villeneuve, Italy

The Romanesque Santa Maria (St. Mary's) church, which is located at the foot of the medieval castle, was the seat of the parish until the end of the 18th century. The bell tower is a typical square shaped tower. During the digs carried out in the building, the remains of the ancient early-Christian church and the relative baptismal font were found. The semi-circular shaped crypt, near the choir, dates back to the 11th century. Inside the church you can still admire important frescos from the 13th to the 16th century, as well as furnishings.

You can access the church on foot, within the space of five minutes, from the road that unwinds from the bridge over the Dora Baltea.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

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User Reviews

riccardo correnti (19 months ago)
Christian Luccisano (2 years ago)
Bellissima Cattedrale, monumento di Aosta!
Sara Manella (2 years ago)
Chiesa parrocchiale del comune di Villeneuve, sulla piazza pedonale al centro del paese.
tiziana pellissier (3 years ago)
La Chiesa è nel centro del piccolo comune di Villeneuve.
Max (4 years ago)
Bellissima chiesa.
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