Roman Theatre

Vienne, France

The Roman theatre in Vienne was built around 40-50 AD and is considered to be one of the largest theatres in Roman Antiquity with a capacity of 11500 seats and a diameter of 130 metres. In the 2nd century it was double sized by a second smaller theater, the odeon, which was built nearby on the southern slope of the ravine of Saint-Marcel.

The annual Vienne Jazz Festival has been held on the ancient theatre since 1980. 

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Address

Rue du Cirque 7, Vienne, France
See all sites in Vienne

Details

Founded: 40-50 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

www.vienne-tourisme.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Allison Emanuel Arato (10 months ago)
Under renovation unfortunately.
Brian Thome (11 months ago)
A construction site. Lots of workers look like they are wiping out every last vestige of imperial Rome. Or something like that. See for yourself by climbing up to the the belvedere overlooking the site.
Lukas Zeman (2 years ago)
Beautiful!
Stephani Kyle (2 years ago)
Catch any show here! Jazz fest was an awesome experience - so cool to be able to sit in such an ancient and still functional theater. Bring a seat cushion. Parking in the city may not be easy but note that if you don’t want to wait for the 1am back to Lyon you will have very little options as we could not find an Uber or taxi out. It worth getting there early or staying late to visit the courtyard nearby.
Zahara Rouge (2 years ago)
Fun, but very slippery of wet
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