Vienne Cathedral

Vienne, France

Vienne Cathedral, dedicated to Saint Maurice, was the epicopal see of the primate of the ancient Septem Provinciae and of the Archdiocese of Vienne until its abolition confirmed by the Concordat of 1801. It today serves as co-cathedral of the Diocese of Grenoble-Vienne. The present-day building was erected from 1130 onwards.

Mentioned as the burial place of the Burgundian king Boso of Provence in 887, no traces are left from the former church buildings at the site. Construction works at Vienne Cathedral are documented under the tenure of Archbishop Léger from 1030 to 1070.

The construction of the preserved church was begun in a Late Romanesque style about 1130. Built over a long period, Gothic modifications and extensions were carried out until its consecration by Pope Innocent IV on 20 April 1251. From 1311, Pope Clement V convened the Council of Vienne, where the clergy resolved upon the dissolution of the Knights Templar. The facade was added in the 16th century, with the capstone ceremony held in 1529.

The present-day building is a basilica, with three aisles and an apse, but no ambulatory or transepts. The most striking portion is the west front, which rises majestically from a terrace overhanging the Rhône. However, the sculptural decoration was badly damaged by plundering Huguenot forces under Baron François de Beaumont in 1562, during the French Wars of Religion.

In the wake of the French Revolution, the Vienne archdiocese was dissolved and the former cathedral became a plain parish church, while the surrounding premises temporarily served as barns or barracks and eventually were demolished.

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Address

Rue Calixte 2 8, Vienne, France
See all sites in Vienne

Details

Founded: 1130
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mo Al Obaidi (15 months ago)
Beautiful design and quiet
Aaron Mosby (17 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral. Quiet and peaceful.
Thomas Stuart Bridge (3 years ago)
As one of the few Medieval Catholic Cathedrals to have survived the French Revolution it structure demonstrates the Romanesque Architecture of the twelfth century at it lower half topped off by the later Gothic structure of the later fifteenth / sixteen . It interior is exquisite well worth a visit. As indeed is Vienne itself
Paul Gillaspey (3 years ago)
Very nice architecture on outside. Stained glass and tapestries on inside
Max Niedzwiecki (3 years ago)
This is a beautiful cathedral, where it's possible to have a peaceful visit because it never seems to be too crowded. Well restored, but not overly decorated or lit-up. A treasure.
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