Temple of Augustus and Livia

Vienne, France

Temple d'Auguste et de Livie is a well-preserved Roman place of worship constructed around 10 BC and dedicated to Rome and Augustus. Built on the holy area of the forum, its was converted into a church at the beginning of the 5th century. The building was restored in between 1823 and 1853.

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Details

Founded: 10 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

www.vienne-tourisme.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Allison Emanuel Arato (10 months ago)
Wow! Just sitting there next to a couple restaurants. Can't go in but so worth a look.
Graham Atkinson (2 years ago)
Have a coffee overlooking this wonderful temple. Not sure if you get inside.
Phil Barnes (2 years ago)
The temple and the tower behind it ( a jail) Is fascinating. The Saturday market about a block away is a cook’s dream. I was so lucky to spend that Saturday in late September 2017 there.
Milan Zvara (2 years ago)
Nicely preserved temple, pity you cant see it from inside.
Franklin Paredes (2 years ago)
This magnificent Temple was built in the first century BC, apparently due to a fire or an earthquake, the front part had to be reconstructed about a century later... After the fall of the Roman empire, Christianity invaded the Gaul, fortunately they didn't destroyed this "impure" temple, but they readapted it as a church; thanks to that, we can enjoy this beautiful jewel, on a very original state.
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