Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon

Lyon, France

The Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon is housed near place des Terreaux in a former Benedictine convent of the 17th and 18th centuries. It is one of the largest art museums in France. Its collections range from ancient Egypt antiquities to the Modern art period and make the museum one of the most important in Europe.

The paintings department has European paintings of 14th- to mid-20th-century paintings. They are arranged chronologically and by major schools in 35 rooms. At the heart of the abbey's former cloister is now a municipal garden, right in the centre of the town, on the peninsula. It is decorated with several 19th century's statues.

Ancient Egypt is the main theme of the museum's antiquities department, due to the historic importance of egyptology in Lyon, animated by men like Victor Loret, whose family gave over 1000 objects to the museum in 1954. From 1895, the musée du Louvre provided nearly 400 objects (unguent vases, funerary figurines etc.) to form the foundation of the department.

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Founded: 1801
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philippa Rasidi (55 days ago)
Three levels and a garden of gorgeous paintings, sculptures and artefacts! They have a beautiful cafe / restaurant over looking the garden. Would recommend going in the hottest part of the day and stopping after the first two floors for lunch then finishing on the 3 floor with paintings by Renoir and Monet!
Laura C. (2 months ago)
Stunning place I had a great visit, the pieces presented don’t have much space restriction so you can look the sculptures and painting really close! They give you a map and the rooms are numbered so you don’t get lost and it makes sure that you’ll see everything After entering, before getting into the museum itself there’s a cute little garden thing that’s is pretty atmospheric and relaxing with some sculptures sprinkled on it :)
Maurizio Nasi (2 months ago)
A beautiful museum, with variety of pieces of art, hosted in a beautiful building. Not so many masterpiece, but very pleasant to stroll with a reasonable price. The garden is very nice and there are lockers accessible to everybody which are convenient.
Charles Taylor (13 months ago)
Well laid out and spacious. Too much to see in a couple of hours, but the ticket allows to come back later on the same day. The lighting could be improved a bit on some paintings as the frame casts a bit if a shadow.
Lars de V. (2 years ago)
Has everything a large museum has (time periods) but on a smaller scale.
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