Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon

Lyon, France

The Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon is housed near place des Terreaux in a former Benedictine convent of the 17th and 18th centuries. It is one of the largest art museums in France. Its collections range from ancient Egypt antiquities to the Modern art period and make the museum one of the most important in Europe.

The paintings department has European paintings of 14th- to mid-20th-century paintings. They are arranged chronologically and by major schools in 35 rooms. At the heart of the abbey's former cloister is now a municipal garden, right in the centre of the town, on the peninsula. It is decorated with several 19th century's statues.

Ancient Egypt is the main theme of the museum's antiquities department, due to the historic importance of egyptology in Lyon, animated by men like Victor Loret, whose family gave over 1000 objects to the museum in 1954. From 1895, the musée du Louvre provided nearly 400 objects (unguent vases, funerary figurines etc.) to form the foundation of the department.

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Details

Founded: 1801
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roman Goossens (2 years ago)
In the middle of the city and very nice gallery with paintings and art spanning many centuries. From Ancient Egyptian to the most contemporary. Set out on three floors it can be explored relatively rapidly or more slowly depending on the amount of time one has. An audio tour is also available. The pretty courtyard at the entrance is a nice place to relax.
M1978 A (2 years ago)
Very interesting collections in an beautiful and charming 17th century abbey. Beautiful court and the chapel with older elements was converted into a sculpture exhibition hall. Very impressive.
Niuniu Miao (2 years ago)
What could be better go to a museum and have a wonderful art travel? Living in Lyon for 4 years, my monthly activity is to go this museum and enjoy my time. The exposition here is always good, never feel disappointed. If you are a student, by a carte musée, seriously it worth!
Hugo Pedro-Martins (2 years ago)
What a wonderful surprise this museum was. I wasn't expecting a huge museum filled with so much art covering so many periods. It is a must see in Lyon! The Egyptian sectian was particularly beautiful!
Sarah Pinnell (3 years ago)
We spent a good couple of hours there and it had some lovely sculptures and numerous rooms on several floors filled with a wide range of artwork spanning the ages. There are quite a few notable paintings and other items here and the free leaflet was very informative, highlighting on a floor plan exactly where these key works were to be found. Definitely worth visiting.
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