Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon

Lyon, France

The Museum of Fine Arts of Lyon is housed near place des Terreaux in a former Benedictine convent of the 17th and 18th centuries. It is one of the largest art museums in France. Its collections range from ancient Egypt antiquities to the Modern art period and make the museum one of the most important in Europe.

The paintings department has European paintings of 14th- to mid-20th-century paintings. They are arranged chronologically and by major schools in 35 rooms. At the heart of the abbey's former cloister is now a municipal garden, right in the centre of the town, on the peninsula. It is decorated with several 19th century's statues.

Ancient Egypt is the main theme of the museum's antiquities department, due to the historic importance of egyptology in Lyon, animated by men like Victor Loret, whose family gave over 1000 objects to the museum in 1954. From 1895, the musée du Louvre provided nearly 400 objects (unguent vases, funerary figurines etc.) to form the foundation of the department.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1801
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roman Goossens (2 years ago)
In the middle of the city and very nice gallery with paintings and art spanning many centuries. From Ancient Egyptian to the most contemporary. Set out on three floors it can be explored relatively rapidly or more slowly depending on the amount of time one has. An audio tour is also available. The pretty courtyard at the entrance is a nice place to relax.
M1978 A (2 years ago)
Very interesting collections in an beautiful and charming 17th century abbey. Beautiful court and the chapel with older elements was converted into a sculpture exhibition hall. Very impressive.
Niuniu Miao (2 years ago)
What could be better go to a museum and have a wonderful art travel? Living in Lyon for 4 years, my monthly activity is to go this museum and enjoy my time. The exposition here is always good, never feel disappointed. If you are a student, by a carte musée, seriously it worth!
Hugo Pedro-Martins (2 years ago)
What a wonderful surprise this museum was. I wasn't expecting a huge museum filled with so much art covering so many periods. It is a must see in Lyon! The Egyptian sectian was particularly beautiful!
Sarah Pinnell (3 years ago)
We spent a good couple of hours there and it had some lovely sculptures and numerous rooms on several floors filled with a wide range of artwork spanning the ages. There are quite a few notable paintings and other items here and the free leaflet was very informative, highlighting on a floor plan exactly where these key works were to be found. Definitely worth visiting.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.