Metallic tower of Fourviére

Lyon, France

The Tour métallique de Fourvière (Metallic tower of Fourvière), a landmark of Lyon, is a steel framework tower which bears a striking resemblance to the Eiffel Tower, which predates it by three years. With a height of 85.9 metres and weight of 210 tons, the 'metallic tower' was built between 1892 and 1894.

During the Exposition universelle of 1914 in Lyon it had a restaurant and an elevator capable of taking 22 people up to the summit. Although used as an observation tower until November 1, 1953, nowadays it serves as a television tower and is not accessible to the public. At 372m, it is the highest point in Lyon.

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    Details

    Founded: 1892-1894
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Gerard Moloney (19 months ago)
    Worth a quick detour to take a photo.
    Maxime LMA (2 years ago)
    Confusing
    Maxime LMA (2 years ago)
    Confusing
    Gillian Playe (2 years ago)
    Nothing special, just a smaller version of the Eiffel Tower. Not really beautiful.
    Gillian Playe (2 years ago)
    Nothing special, just a smaller version of the Eiffel Tower. Not really beautiful.
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