Hôtel de Ville

Lyon, France

The Hôtel de Ville is the city hall of Lyon and one of the largest historic buildings in the city. In the 17th century, Lyon was developed and the Presqu'île became the city center with the place of Terreaux, and the Lyon City Hall was built between 1645 and 1651 by Simon Maupin.

Following a fire in 1674, the building was restored and modified, including its facade, designed by Jules Hardouin-Mansart and his pupil Robert de Cotte. In 1792 during the French Revolution, the half-relief of Louis XIV on horseback, in the middle of the facade was removed and replaced only during the Restoration by Henry IV of France, in the same posture.

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Address

Rue Joseph Serlin 6, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 1645
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MissSJ (2 years ago)
The architectural beauty stands in awe of the Square. The picture tells it even without seeing it.
Peter Bromley (2 years ago)
A very fine piece of 17th century French architecture. The rooms inside are really beautiful, a little over the top for my liking, but very stately. All about show, the workmanship and attention to detail is amazing.
Dionisis Frantzis (2 years ago)
The architecture of this building is amazing! And it's in the heart of the City.
Steffel Fenix (4 years ago)
Went for a Lyon and China conference with companies from China. It was great reception and great food. The conference room is really beautiful.
Teng Xi (4 years ago)
Beautiful architecture well worth going to see. We had surprisingly warm and sunny weather for the time of year which only helped make everything seem beautiful!
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