Hôtel de Ville

Lyon, France

The Hôtel de Ville is the city hall of Lyon and one of the largest historic buildings in the city. In the 17th century, Lyon was developed and the Presqu'île became the city center with the place of Terreaux, and the Lyon City Hall was built between 1645 and 1651 by Simon Maupin.

Following a fire in 1674, the building was restored and modified, including its facade, designed by Jules Hardouin-Mansart and his pupil Robert de Cotte. In 1792 during the French Revolution, the half-relief of Louis XIV on horseback, in the middle of the facade was removed and replaced only during the Restoration by Henry IV of France, in the same posture.

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Address

Rue Joseph Serlin 6, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 1645
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

hari haran (15 months ago)
A beautiful place or a square to have fun with friends
Pixel (2 years ago)
So gorgeous!!
joby akkara (2 years ago)
Nice food
Boyko TK (2 years ago)
An exquisite and magnificent building preserved for generations! 3-D mapping during the festival of light is something to be seen!
Antoine M (3 years ago)
An impressive building and one of the largest historic buildings in Lyon. Right in front and opposite Lyon Opera House in Place de la Comédie. Classified as a national monument. Beautiful pediment and belfry tower. Never been inside but a spectacular building to look at. From Place des Terreaux is even more impressive and notice the half-relief of Henry IV of France on horseback. This relief replaced the previous one of Louis XIV which was removed. Gorgeous building and an iconic monument of Lyon.
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