Historic Site of Lyons

Lyon, France

The Historic Site of Lyons was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998. The long history of Lyons, which was founded by the Romans in the 1st century B.C. as the capital of the Three Gauls and has continued to play a major role in Europe's political, cultural and economic development ever since, is vividly illustrated by its urban fabric and the many fine historic buildings from all periods.

The specific regions composing the Historic Site include the Roman district and Fourvière, the Renaissance district (Vieux Lyon), the silk district (slopes of Croix-Rousse), and the Presqu'île, which features architecture from the 12th century to modern times. Both Vieux Lyon and the slopes of Croix-Rousse are known for their narrow passageways that pass through buildings and link streets on either side. The first examples of traboules are thought to have been built in Lyon in the 4th century.

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Address

Place Bellecour 8, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 0-100 BC
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in France
Historical period: Arrival of Celts (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arnaud Roguet (2 years ago)
A dormant place lost behind a building with few indications. You really have to look to find.
Arnaud Roguet (2 years ago)
A dormant place lost behind a building with few indications. You really have to look to find.
Le coin de Telum (2 years ago)
A surprising place in the heart of Lyon, green and pleasant for a family outing or meeting with friends. Place visited during a visit / game in Lyon.
Chris Conroy (2 years ago)
Its nice to see a piece of history but compared to others that you can find it was quite disappointing
Chris Conroy (2 years ago)
Its nice to see a piece of history but compared to others that you can find it was quite disappointing
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