Historic Site of Lyons

Lyon, France

The Historic Site of Lyons was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998. The long history of Lyons, which was founded by the Romans in the 1st century B.C. as the capital of the Three Gauls and has continued to play a major role in Europe's political, cultural and economic development ever since, is vividly illustrated by its urban fabric and the many fine historic buildings from all periods.

The specific regions composing the Historic Site include the Roman district and Fourvière, the Renaissance district (Vieux Lyon), the silk district (slopes of Croix-Rousse), and the Presqu'île, which features architecture from the 12th century to modern times. Both Vieux Lyon and the slopes of Croix-Rousse are known for their narrow passageways that pass through buildings and link streets on either side. The first examples of traboules are thought to have been built in Lyon in the 4th century.

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Address

Place Bellecour 8, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 0-100 BC
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in France
Historical period: Arrival of Celts (France)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erik Ambarian (10 months ago)
Прекрасное место. Сердце города. Дети с удовольствием могут лазить по руинам античного Лиона.
BAS Jean-Paul (2 years ago)
Pas très bien signalé, explications effacés à cause du temps mais on imagine emplacements canalisations et cabines.
Pwell L. aus D. (2 years ago)
Not too spectacular but nice for a rest. You have to walk up some stairs opposite of the church and pass through a walkway below the residential building.
Chloé Gruet (2 years ago)
Très difficiles à trouver il faut passer sous un immeuble et avec assez peu d'indications.
Olivier Benoit (3 years ago)
Vestiges cachés dans le jardin d'une résidence, datant de l'aire galo-romaine. Ce n'est pas extraordinaire mais avec un peu d'imagination ca reste exceptionnel.
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