Lyon Cathedral

Lyon, France

Lyon Cathedral was founded by Saint Pothinus and Saint Irenaeus, the first two bishops of Lyon. The cathedral is also known as a Primatiale because in 1079 the Pope granted to the archbishop of Lyon the title of Primate of All the Gauls with the legal supremacy over the principal archbishops of the kingdom. It is located in the heart of the old town, less than five minutes away from the banks of the Saône river, with a large plaza in front of it and a metro stop nearby providing easy access to and from the city center.

Begun in the 12th century on the ruins of a 6th-century church, the cathedral was completed in 1476. The building is 80 meters long (internally), 20 meters wide at the choir, and 32.5 meters high in the nave. The cathedral organ was built by Daublaine and Callinet and was installed in 1841 at the end of the apse and had 15 stops. It was rebuilt in 1875 by Merklin-Schütze and given 30 stops, three keyboards of 54 notes and pedals for 27.

Noteworthy are the two crosses to right and left of the altar, preserved since the council of 1274 as a symbol of the union of the churches, and the Bourbon chapel, built by the Cardinal de Bourbon and his brother Pierre de Bourbon, son-in-law of Louis XI, a masterpiece of 15th century sculpture.

The cathedral also has the Lyon Astronomical Clock from the 14th century.

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Address

Place Saint-Jean 3, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 1180
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jolina Cuevas (11 months ago)
The cathedral is currently under renovation but it's still open for mass. The construction by the entrance within the church may discourage you but you can still admire the beauty of the cathedral by walking past it.
Ricardo Cantu (11 months ago)
Another excellent visit to a gorgeous, historical Cathedral. You take the tram down from the top and enjoy the view down and the beautiful Cathedral.
Bronwyn Bertal (11 months ago)
Magnificent, down to every fine detail of this ancient beauty.
Cliff Brown (12 months ago)
I don't know how they did it Beautiful
Niuniu Miao (12 months ago)
A must visit in Lyon. From here, the street to enjoy a lunch of bouchons lyonnais, the funiculaire to the Fourviere, the cute view of old city...
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