Homburg was first mentioned in documents in 1276. Gottfried I of Sayn from the House of Sponheim (1247-1283/84) transferred his castrum Homburg to the German King Rudolf of Habsburg, in order to place it under his protection. He received the castle back as an inheritance. The castle was the residence of the Counts of Homburg, an imperial fiefdom (Reichsherrschaft).

From 1635 Count Ernst von Sayn-Wittgenstein altered the castle to its present-day appearance. One hundred years later the line of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg took over its management; the structure then fell into disrepair. Not until 1904 was its decline halted and, in 1926, a museum, founded by Hermann Conrad, took over the premises. Today it is the Museum of Oberbergisches Kreis.

In 1999 during an excavation, a stone keep of about 12.5 metres diameter was uncovered. Experts estimate that it dates to the 11th century. A consequence of this was that the history of the castle had to be reassessed to that time.

At the beginning of 2005 the district council decided to upgrade the castle. Their plans included inter alia the expansion of the 'Red House' (Rotes Haus) and the construction of a central cash desk and toilet area. The old orangery was to be torn down and replaced by a new two-storey administration and exhibition building.

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Details

Founded: 11th century/1635
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sch. Lehmann (3 years ago)
Dieser Ort ist sehr schön und eine Reise wert
Roberto Massa (3 years ago)
Eine wunderschöne Städtchen, saubere Luft, großartige Schloss and es ist auch eine sehr gut Restaurant in der Nähe!
Jennifer Ki-Lu (3 years ago)
Schönes Schloss, die Führung war ganz toll. Danke, dass wir als Posaunenchor bei ihnen spielen durften.
Oliver Pack (3 years ago)
Schon seit meiner Kindheit kenne ich Schloss Homburg und durfte hier schon die Geschichte und Erlebnisse der Ritter von Berg nachempfinden. Und noch immer ist das Schloss für mich einen Besuch wert. Das neue gestaltete Forum eignet sich hervorragend für niveauvolle Events bis 150 Personen
Federico Körting (4 years ago)
Excellent
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