Gudenau Castle

Wachtberg, Germany

The imposing two-part moated Burg Gudenau is the largest castle in the municipality of Wachtberg. Its grounds are a special feature, as they are the only Baroque garden under private ownership in the Rhineland.

The castle stands in a flood plain at the foot of Villip, at the confluence of the Godesberg and Arzdorf streams. Built in the early 13th century, the main castle with four wings was extended in about 1560 with extensive grounds to the rear. Additions were made here such as bays and curved roofs. In the 17th century the remarkable gardens were created under an Italian influence. A second lower castle with its imposing five-storey gate tower, a slate hipped roof and an eight-sided clock tower feature on the visible side of the castle. The main castle also possesses a Gothic bay and a round corner tower with a pointed slate dome, whilst the remaining three corner towers have Baroque domes.

The castle is under private ownership.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.bonn-region.de

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea G (3 years ago)
There's a lot to discover here
Rolf Groenenwald (4 years ago)
Very nice castle complex. Is privately owned. During the day you can visit the inner courtyard. Behind the facility there is a parking area, which is presumably also allowed to be entered.
Bernd Pelz (4 years ago)
Even if the the interior of the privately owned castle cannot be visited, the delightful architecture of the 16 th century castel warrants a visit. The court yard is accessible.
Heinz-Otto Lindner (5 years ago)
Nicht zu besuchen s
Harry Grabowski (6 years ago)
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