St. Anne's Museum Quarter

Lübeck, Germany

St. Anne's Museum Quarter was previously an Augustinian nunnery, St. Anne's Priory. Since 1915 it has housed St. Anne's Museum, one of Lübeck's museums of art and cultural history containing Germany's largest collection of medieval sculpture and altar-pieces, including the famous altars by Hans Memling (formerly at Lübeck Cathedral), Bernt Notke, Hermen Rode, Jacob van Utrecht and Benedikt Dreyer.

These are exhibited on the building's first floor.is a museum and art exhibition hall located near St. Giles Church and next to the synagogue in the south-east of the city of Lübeck, Germany.

On the building's second floor is exhibited a large collection of home decor items and interiors of different periods, showing how the area's citizens lived from medieval times up to the 1800s.

A modern addition houses special exhibits. The museum is part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage site.

St. Anne's Priory and the associated church, which was constructed rather quickly due to lack of space, were built 1502–1515 in late Brick Gothic style. The monastery was used mainly for the accommodation of unmarried women who were citizens in Lübeck.

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Details

Founded: 1915
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arto Kallio (2 years ago)
We met the kindest ever guide in this museum
Wim Dreyer (2 years ago)
Brilliant art exhibition
Dlovan Kassab (2 years ago)
The place is very nice. Unfortunately the 8nformation wasnt so clear. But the service in the reception was good.
Dlovan Kassab (2 years ago)
The place is very nice. Unfortunately the 8nformation wasnt so clear. But the service in the reception was good.
Sven Wardle (2 years ago)
A beautifully calm, high quality experience. Miles too much here to do it all justice in an hour or so. We felt bad moving on so quickly. Definitely a reason to come back.
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