The Château de la Napoule was constructed in the 14th century by the Countess of Villeneuve. Over the centuries it was rebuilt several times. In the 19th century it was turned into a glass factory. In 1918, it was purchased by Americans, Henry Clews Jr. and Marie Clews (1880-1959), who restored and moved into the castle. They added additional sections in their own personal style, with sculptures by Henry Clews Jr. The castle is owned by the La Napoule Art Foundation, which was founded in 1951 by Marie Clews, and serves as a cultural centre.

After Henry's death and during the Second World War, the castle was captured by German soldiers. Marie Clews served the soldiers by acting as the maid of the castle's staff so she could stay close to her home and the memory of her husband.

When the Clews acquired the castle, the park had cedar and eucalyptus trees, and had been abandoned for years. Marie Clews began the restoration of the gardens. The park of the castle today has elements of a garden à la française and of an English landscape garden, with a grand alley, basins, perspectives, and views of the sea. In addition, there are three smaller gardens in the Italian style: the Garden de la Mancha next to the Tower of La Mancha, under which the mausoleum of the Clews family is located; the terraces which overlook the Bay of Cannes, which are planted with cypress trees, hedges and rosemary; and the secret garden, in a corner of the walls with windows looking at the sea, with a Venetian well in the centre.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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User Reviews

Alyne Elbaz (4 months ago)
Once upon a Castel, IN LOVE
Zafar Azam (8 months ago)
Amazing buildings and scenery. Visited during Christmas so the streets were quite which actually made it even more breathtaking and peaceful.
Luay Alamir (10 months ago)
One of the best places I have seen in my life.
Nadiavera Tjhin (10 months ago)
Cheap entrance (6€) including a guided tour of the castle. Our guide was wonderful.
Sharenthy (13 months ago)
You can enjoy many activities there. Near from the castle is easy for find restaurant. You can hacking the little mountain and find the other beach. You can find easier the parking and public shower. The parking is free on Sunday
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