Hotel Negresco

Nice, France

The Hotel Negresco is located on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France. It was named after Henri Negresco (1868–1920), who had the palatial hotel constructed in 1912. Today it is considered as the landmark of so-called Belle Époque era in French Riviera.

Henri Negresco was the son of an innkeeper. He was educated and worked as a confectioner at the luxurious Casa Capșa in Bucharest, Romania, left home at the age of 25 going first to Paris then to the French Riviera where he became very successful. As director of the Municipal Casino in Nice, he had the idea to build a sumptuous hotel of quality that would attract the wealthiest of clients. After arranging the financing, he hired the great architect of the 'café society' Édouard-Jean Niermans to design the hotel and its now famous pink dome.

The spectacular Baccarat, 16,309-crystal chandelier in the Negresco's Royal Lounge was commissioned by Czar Nicholas II, who due to the October revolution was unable to take delivery.

Henri Negresco faced a downturn in his affairs when World War I broke out two years after he opened for business. His hotel was converted to a hospital. By the end of the war, the number of wealthy visitors to the Riviera had dropped off to the point that the hotel was in severe financial difficulty. Seized by creditors, the Negresco was sold to a Belgian company. Henri Negresco died a few years later in Paris at the age of 52.

Over the years, the hotel had its ups and downs, and in 1957, it was sold to the Augier family. Madame Jeanne Augier reinvigorated the hotel with luxurious decorations and furnishings, including an outstanding art collection and rooms with mink bedspreads. Noted for its doormen dressed in the manner of the staff in 18th-century elite bourgeois households, complete with red-plumed postilion hats, the hotel also offers renowned gourmet dining at the Regency-style Le Chantecler restaurant.

Le Chantecler has two stars in the Guide Michelin and 15/20 in Gault Millau. It has previously been under the leadership of famous chefs such as Bruno Turbot and Alain Llorca, who left to take over the equally fabled Moulin de Mougins. The restaurant features a fabulous interior with gobelins and roccoco furniture in untraditional colourings of pink, lime, lemon, cerulean etc.

In 2003, the Hotel Negresco was listed by the government of France as a National Historic Building and is a member of Leading Hotels of the World. The Negresco has a total of 119 guest rooms plus 22 suites.

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    Founded: 1912
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    4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Turgay Ölmezoğlu (8 months ago)
    Mediterranean cuisine Hıghly recommended
    Janet Zeile (10 months ago)
    I want to write about the Negresco Hotel, but can’t seem to pull it up. (La Rotonde is the restaurant that is in the Negresco Hotel). This is a classic, elegant hotel. My great grandmother stayed there on one of her cruises. There was a sticker of the Negresco Hotel on her steamer trunk. On one of my tours of Europe, I met Lucien Nocentini, a former concierge of the Negresco Hotel. Prior to that, he was a professional soccer player for team Monaco. When I knew him, he was the concierge of the Hotel Albion in Nice. He told me that he could set me up for a very good price. I took him up on that and the following summer I spent a month on the Riviera for $11 a night!! Can’t beat that!!! The hotel was only 6 blocks from the beach. I had a fabulous time and enjoyed conversing in French daily. I want to come back soon. (When this Covid mess is over). I love France 🇫🇷 and am proud of my French heritage. Viva la France❣️
    Andi Rehberg (11 months ago)
    We went there for dinner. They serve excellent wine. The food looks good on the plate but for our taste it was kind of stale. There is not much on the plate but enough as it does not kindle your hunger. The staff is super nice and they seem to be professional part time photographer :) The bill was just fine. The music is nice the ambiance good. 4 stars out of 5
    Odile Bellieud (12 months ago)
    Extra
    Joshie Green (13 months ago)
    Good service, lovely setting and average food. Would recommend the chocolate pudding.
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