Hotel Negresco

Nice, France

The Hotel Negresco is located on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France. It was named after Henri Negresco (1868–1920), who had the palatial hotel constructed in 1912. Today it is considered as the landmark of so-called Belle Époque era in French Riviera.

Henri Negresco was the son of an innkeeper. He was educated and worked as a confectioner at the luxurious Casa Capșa in Bucharest, Romania, left home at the age of 25 going first to Paris then to the French Riviera where he became very successful. As director of the Municipal Casino in Nice, he had the idea to build a sumptuous hotel of quality that would attract the wealthiest of clients. After arranging the financing, he hired the great architect of the 'café society' Édouard-Jean Niermans to design the hotel and its now famous pink dome.

The spectacular Baccarat, 16,309-crystal chandelier in the Negresco's Royal Lounge was commissioned by Czar Nicholas II, who due to the October revolution was unable to take delivery.

Henri Negresco faced a downturn in his affairs when World War I broke out two years after he opened for business. His hotel was converted to a hospital. By the end of the war, the number of wealthy visitors to the Riviera had dropped off to the point that the hotel was in severe financial difficulty. Seized by creditors, the Negresco was sold to a Belgian company. Henri Negresco died a few years later in Paris at the age of 52.

Over the years, the hotel had its ups and downs, and in 1957, it was sold to the Augier family. Madame Jeanne Augier reinvigorated the hotel with luxurious decorations and furnishings, including an outstanding art collection and rooms with mink bedspreads. Noted for its doormen dressed in the manner of the staff in 18th-century elite bourgeois households, complete with red-plumed postilion hats, the hotel also offers renowned gourmet dining at the Regency-style Le Chantecler restaurant.

Le Chantecler has two stars in the Guide Michelin and 15/20 in Gault Millau. It has previously been under the leadership of famous chefs such as Bruno Turbot and Alain Llorca, who left to take over the equally fabled Moulin de Mougins. The restaurant features a fabulous interior with gobelins and roccoco furniture in untraditional colourings of pink, lime, lemon, cerulean etc.

In 2003, the Hotel Negresco was listed by the government of France as a National Historic Building and is a member of Leading Hotels of the World. The Negresco has a total of 119 guest rooms plus 22 suites.

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    Founded: 1912
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    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Huiting Jin (18 months ago)
    Hotel is literally a art gallery. corridors are filled with paintings and vintage furnitures. But I adjusted many paintings while I walked by, many were tilted. The room is very spacious, bathroom is thoughtfully designed. Vividly colors. The service is nice, but maybe because too many guests at lobby, the service there is not impressive, one thing I dislike the most is nobody helps us with doors, especially when we were with suitcases; not mention the few stairs in front of entrance, it’s almost expected that someone helps a lady with suitcase when many staff were just standing around.
    Tricia C (19 months ago)
    Beautiful structure. Not available for a walk about. The general public can enjoy the bar/restaurant. Expect to pay a premium for the honour of getting into the hotel. Take a walk to the restroom and you will see some lovely art, jewelry under glass, odd antiques. Totally worth the experience.
    Dr Niyaz Mohammad (19 months ago)
    One of the oldest hotel in the region and right across the beach. Vintage hotel carefully refurbished from time to time. The owner has a taste for collectors items and paintings. The hotel is like museum, well taken care ..lots of vintage items and paintings on display. She is fond of animal paintings and these paintings can be found on every floor. Rooms luxurious , spacious. Restaurant and food - good.
    Imane Zouhir (19 months ago)
    For a 5 stars hotel it looks very old. Not vintage, just old. Doors make noise when you open them and the interior is quite kitsch, too colorful. The lounge, the dining rooms and all except for rooms are very nice with drawings and paintings on the wall. Nothing to say about the service and the receptionist, all very kind and professional.
    The Travel Guy (2 years ago)
    This review is just for the bar/cafe. Great service and great virgin drinks. One can tell that this hotel has a storied history. The art is an eclectic mix and quite interesting to see en route to the restrooms (as a bar patron that’s a perk). Pricey, but they’ve probably earned their luxury-chic status.
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