Château de Tourrette-Levens

Tourrette-Levens, France

The modest-sized castle Château de Tourrette-Levens dates back to the 12th century. It overlooks the ancient 'salt road'. The castle was buily by Raymond Chabaud whose family owned the estate until 1684. The castle was one of the finest in the region with six towers. Only one tower survives. Today it hosts a museum devoted to entomology.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fabienne Aucun (5 months ago)
Joli château, belle balade et beau point de vue sur la mer et le village. En plus vois avez le musée de la préhistoire, des papillons et des outils anciens
Addyharmo Recordings (7 months ago)
C'est pour moi l'un des plus beaux panoramas de la région. Vue exceptionnelle sur toute la vallée. Endroit reposant bien fréquenté par les habitants du village. En été, certaines festivités de village s'y produisent le soir et c'est encore mieux pour profiter de cet endroit ! Parfait !
Giovanni Filippone (16 months ago)
Great view. Amazing medieval place
Sergei Goriachev (2 years ago)
Excellent location that gives more than you expect. Besides we’ve got very warm welcome there.
Serge (3 years ago)
Very close to Nice, charming place, not overcrowded
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