Runsa was a prehistoric hill fortification, strategically situated on a 30 meter high rock promontory in Lake Mälaren. The ancient fort covers an area of 200 x 100 meters. The site was excavated first in 1902 with the participation of Crown Prince Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden. It was later investigated by archaeologists in 1992.

Below the ruins is a stone ship burial area with some 30 graves. The burial ground is made up of round stones estimated to date from 400 - 500 AD. It is 56 feet from the bow to the stern and is one of the best known stone circles in Sweden.

Runsa manor (Runsa herrgård) is surrounded by the ruins of Runsa and other monuments. In 1313 the estate was sold to the Archbishop of Uppsala. It was suppressed by King Gustav Vasa, but was sold by his grandson Jacob De la Gardie. The main building, from the mid-1600s, and was most possibly built countess Ebba Brahe, who was the mistress of King Gustavus Adolphus.

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Details

Founded: 400-500 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Migration Period (Sweden)

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