The town of Bulle initially developed around its church which was, in 9th century, an ecclesiastical center of importance. The construction of the castle began certainly under the episcopate from Boniface (1231-1239). After the annexation of Bulle by the town of Freiburg, the castle became, since 1537, residence of the bailiffs'. Since 1848, it is the seat of the Prefecture of the Gruyère and receives the Court, the state police and the prisons.

Forming a quadrilateral of 41 x 44 meters, it includes main buildings on three sides. Its construction was carried out according to plans' of the Savoyard Castles, with small towers in the 4 corners.

The keep, enormous and separated by a small court, 33 meters is high and broad of 2.16m at its base. Its entry of origin is located at 9.7m ground. Less imposing, the turns of the three other angles are little towers placed in overhang in top of the walls.

This historical fortress has escaped with the fire which destroyed the city in 1805.

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Founded: 1230s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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G K (2 years ago)
Stunning views from the watchtower!!
G K (2 years ago)
Stunning views from the watchtower!!
Ferreira Amalia (2 years ago)
Linda paisagem, bem conservador.
Christian Frei (3 years ago)
Nothing special, looks quite cute. :) No information or anything about the castle. So no way to inform yourself. And its pretty small.
Christian Frei (3 years ago)
Nothing special, looks quite cute. :) No information or anything about the castle. So no way to inform yourself. And its pretty small.
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