The Doksany town is well-known mainly for its monastery established probably already in 1144 by Vladislav II. The heyday of the monastery was in the 13th and 14th centuries. It was completely desolated during the Thirty Years’ War. After that it was rebuilt into the Baroque appearance in 17th century. During the 19th century the monastery became a chateau.

Doksany Monastery has been used to film BBC's The Musketeers, an HBO's Knightfall series.

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Doksany, Czech Republic
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Founded: 1144
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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doksany.czech-mountains.eu

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Blanka Kucerova (15 months ago)
Worth to visit.
Václav Neo (15 months ago)
Krásné místo, zajímavý výklad pana průvodce. Bohužel bude ještě dlouho trvat, než bude tato památka celá opravena.
Ivana Štenclová (15 months ago)
Skvělý zážitek. Pokud půjdete bez dětí, udělejte si chvilku na prohlídku s průvodcem. Zajímavé povídání o historii místa. A překvapení pro mě na konci prohlídky, viz foto
Libor Vašíček (15 months ago)
Bylo to tu velmi zajímavé a díky fopa našeho skupinového srandisty jsme to měly i s perfektním výkladem od místního průvodce.
Martin Dindos (18 months ago)
Outside market
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Externsteine Stones

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